The Counter Revolution Of 1776

Author: Gerald Horne
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479806897
Size: 47.50 MB
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The successful 1776 revolt against British rule in North America has been hailed almost universally as a great step forward for humanity. But the Africans then living in the colonies overwhelmingly sided with the British. In this trailblazing book, Gerald Horne shows that in the prelude to 1776, the abolition of slavery seemed all but inevitable in London, delighting Africans as much as it outraged slaveholders, and sparking the colonial revolt. Prior to 1776, anti-slavery sentiments were deepening throughout Britain and in the Caribbean, rebellious Africans were in revolt. For European colonists in America, the major threat to their security was a foreign invasion combined with an insurrection of the enslaved. It was a real and threatening possibility that London would impose abolition throughout the colonies—a possibility the founding fathers feared would bring slave rebellions to their shores. To forestall it, they went to war. The so-called Revolutionary War, Horne writes, was in part a counter-revolution, a conservative movement that the founding fathers fought in order to preserve their right to enslave others. The Counter-Revolution of 1776 brings us to a radical new understanding of the traditional heroic creation myth of the United States.

If You Were There In 1776

Author: Barbara Brenner
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0027123227
Size: 26.49 MB
Format: PDF
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Period prints and drawings highlight a fascinating look back at what life was like in colonial America in 1776, exploring the ways in which children lived on a New England farm, a southern plantation, and on the frontier.

1776

Author: Thomas Fleming
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781539589433
Size: 51.25 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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What is the myth of 1776? To state it in its baldest terms: This was a time in American life when idealism was in full flower. Never have so many great men sprung from nowhere to lead a people in pursuit of liberty. In this book, New York Times bestselling historian Thomas Fleming explodes this myth by examining all the dimensions of that year - particularly the least known aspects of the common, fallible humanity of the men and women of the American Revolution. The year 1776 ended with both the Americans and the British stripped of their illusions. Both sides had been forced to abandon the myth of their invincibility and to confront the realities of human nature on the battlefield and in the struggle for allegiance to their causes. For the Americans, it had been a shock to discover that it was easy to persuade people to cheer for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, but it was another matter to convince them to take large risks, to make real sacrifices for these ideals. For the British, their goal of achieving proper subordination of America to England was frustrated forever. Seventeen seventy-six was a traffic year: Americans fighting in the name of liberty persecuted and sometimes killed fellow Americans who chose to remain loyal to the old order and its more circumscribed, yet sincere, commitment to freedom. Seventeen seventy-six was a year of heroes: It brought forth the leaders who had the courage to fight for freedom. Seventeen seventy-six was a disgraceful year: Americans revealed a capacity for cowardice, disorganization, and incompetence. Here, in this masterful book, is the true story of 1776.

I Survived The American Revolution 1776 I Survived 15

Author: Lauren Tarshis
Publisher: Scholastic Inc.
ISBN: 0545919754
Size: 25.53 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Bestselling author Lauren Tarshis tackles the American Revolution in this latest installment of the groundbreaking, New York Times bestselling I Survived series. British soldiers were everywhere. There was no escape. Nathaniel Fox never imagined he'd find himself in the middle of a blood-soaked battlefield, fighting for his life. He was only eleven years old! He'd barely paid attention to the troubles between America and England. How could he, while being worked to the bone by his cruel uncle, Uriah Storch? But when his uncle's rage forces him to flee the only home he knows, Nate is suddenly propelled toward a thrilling and dangerous journey into the heart of the Revolutionary War. He finds himself in New York City on the brink of what will be the biggest battle yet.

1776

Author: David McCullough
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743287703
Size: 39.27 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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America’s beloved and distinguished historian presents, in a book of breathtaking excitement, drama, and narrative force, the stirring story of the year of our nation’s birth, 1776, interweaving, on both sides of the Atlantic, the actions and decisions that led Great Britain to undertake a war against her rebellious colonial subjects and that placed America’s survival in the hands of George Washington. In this masterful book, David McCullough tells the intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independence—when the whole American cause was riding on their success, without which all hope for independence would have been dashed and the noble ideals of the Declaration would have amounted to little more than words on paper. Based on extensive research in both American and British archives, 1776 is a powerful drama written with extraordinary narrative vitality. It is the story of Americans in the ranks, men of every shape, size, and color, farmers, schoolteachers, shoemakers, no-accounts, and mere boys turned soldiers. And it is the story of the King’s men, the British commander, William Howe, and his highly disciplined redcoats who looked on their rebel foes with contempt and fought with a valor too little known. Written as a companion work to his celebrated biography of John Adams, David McCullough’s 1776 is another landmark in the literature of American history.

Becoming America

Author: Jon Butler
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674006676
Size: 30.61 MB
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Butler's panoramic view of the American colonies after 1680 transforms the customary picture of pre-revolutionary America, revealing a strikingly "modern" character that belies the 18th century quaintness fixed in history. 21 halftones.

West Of The Revolution An Uncommon History Of 1776

Author: Claudio Saunt
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 039324430X
Size: 74.69 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This panoramic account of 1776 chronicles the other revolutions unfolding that year across North America, far beyond the British colonies. In this unique history of 1776, Claudio Saunt looks beyond the familiar story of the thirteen colonies to explore the many other revolutions roiling the turbulent American continent. In that fateful year, the Spanish landed in San Francisco, the Russians pushed into Alaska to hunt valuable sea otters, and the Sioux discovered the Black Hills. Hailed by critics for challenging our conventional view of the birth of America, West of the Revolution “[coaxes] our vision away from the Atlantic seaboard” and “exposes a continent seething with peoples and purposes beyond Minutemen and Redcoats” (Wall Street Journal).

1776

Author: K. M. Kostyal
Publisher: National Geographic Books
ISBN: 1426305176
Size: 65.63 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Gives a close-up look at how the war for independence played out for ordinary citizens such as women, blacksmiths, and enslaved people in colonial Williamsburg.

Power Faith And Fantasy America In The Middle East 1776 To The Present

Author: Michael B. Oren
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393341526
Size: 52.23 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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“Will shape our thinking about America and the Middle East for years.”—Christopher Dickey, Newsweek Power, Faith, and Fantasytells the remarkable story of America's 230-year relationship with the Middle East. Drawing on a vast range of government documents, personal correspondence, and the memoirs of merchants, missionaries, and travelers, Michael B. Oren narrates the unknown story of how the United States has interacted with this vibrant and turbulent region.