A Study Of Scarletts

Author: Margaret D. Bauer
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 1611173744
Size: 34.24 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2446
Download Read Online
There are two portrayals of Scarlett O’Hara: the widely familiar one of the film Gone with the Wind and Margaret Mitchell’s more sympathetic character in the book. In A Study of Scarletts, Margaret D. Bauer examines these two characterizations, noting that although Scarlett O’Hara is just sixteen at the start of the novel, she is criticized for behavior that would have been excused if she were a man. In the end, despite losing nearly every person she loves, Scarlett remains stalwart enough to face another day. For this reason and so many others, Scarlett is an icon in American popular culture and an inspiration to female readers, and yet, she is more often than not condemned for being a sociopathic shrew by those who do not take the time to get to know her through the novel. After providing a more sympathetic reading of Scarlett as a young woman who refuses to accept social limitations based on gender and seeks to be loved for who she is, Bauer examines Scarlett-like characters in other novels. These intertextual readings serve both to develop further a less critical, more compassionate reading of Scarlett O'Hara and to expose societal prejudices against strong women. The chapters in A Study of Scarletts are ordered chronologically according to the novels' settings, beginning with Charles Frazier's Civil War novel Cold Mountain; then Ellen Glasgow's Barren Ground, written a few years before Gone with the Wind but set a generation later, in the years leading up to and just after World War I; Toni Morrison's Sula, which opens after World War I; and finally, a novel by Kat Meads, The Invented Life of Kitty Duncan, with its 1950s- to 1960s-era evolved Scarlett. Through these selections, Bauer shows the persistent tensions that both cause and result from a woman remaining unattached to grow into her own identity without a man, beginning with trouble in the mother-daughter relationship, extending to frustration in romantic relationships, and including the discovery of female friendship as a foundation for facing the future.

A Study Of Scarletts

Author: Margaret Donovan Bauer
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781611173734
Size: 51.76 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2784
Download Read Online
A revealing look at Margaret Mitchell's iconic character, transformed from book to film and inspiring a host of literary offspring

Gone With The Wind

Author: Margaret Mitchell
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416548947
Size: 79.41 MB
Format: PDF
View: 4170
Download Read Online
The turbulent romance of Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett Butler is shaped by the ravages of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Gone With The Wind Maxnotes Literature Guides

Author: Gail Rae
Publisher: Research & Education Assoc.
ISBN: 073867334X
Size: 53.13 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5523
Download Read Online
REA's MAXnotes for Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind MAXnotes offer a fresh look at masterpieces of literature, presented in a lively and interesting fashion. Written by literary experts who currently teach the subject, MAXnotes will enhance your understanding and enjoyment of the work. MAXnotes are designed to stimulate independent thought about the literary work by raising various issues and thought-provoking ideas and questions. MAXnotes cover the essentials of what one should know about each work, including an overall summary, character lists, an explanation and discussion of the plot, the work's historical context, illustrations to convey the mood of the work, and a biography of the author. Each chapter is individually summarized and analyzed, and has study questions and answers.

Scarlett

Author: Alexandra Ripley
Publisher: G K Hall & Co
ISBN: 9780816155279
Size: 62.71 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2560
Download Read Online
The long-awaited sequel to Margaret Mitchell's classic novel is set in the reconstructionist South and answers the oft-asked question, "what happened next?" in the lives of Rhett and Scarlett. (Historical Fiction).

The Wind Done Gone

Author: Alice Randall
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547524935
Size: 59.93 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1522
Download Read Online
In this daring and provocative literary parody which has captured the interest and imagination of a nation, Alice Randall explodes the world created in GONE WITH THE WIND, a work that more than any other has defined our image of the antebellum South. Taking sharp aim at the romanticized, whitewashed mythology perpetrated by this southern classic, Randall has ingeniously conceived a multilayered, emotionally complex tale of her own - that of Cynara, the mulatto half-sister, who, beautiful and brown and born into slavery, manages to break away from the damaging world of the Old South to emerge into full life as a daughter, a lover, a mother, a victor. THE WIND DONE GONE is a passionate love story, a wrenching portrait of a tangled mother-daughter relationship, and a book that "celebrates a people's emancipation not only from bondage but also from history and myth, custom and stereotype" (San Antonio Express-News).

Scarlett S Women

Author: Helen Taylor
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813514963
Size: 21.55 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2660
Download Read Online
Discusses the influence of the book and film versions of Gone With The Wind on their readers and viewers, and shares interviews with fans

Ruth S Journey

Author: Donald McCaig
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451643551
Size: 36.69 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6241
Download Read Online
“Exquisitely imagined, deeply researched, Donald McCaig's Ruth's Journey brings to the foreground the most enigmatic and fascinating figure in Gone with the Wind. This is a brave work of literary empathy by a writer at the height of his powers, who demonstrates a magisterial understanding of the period, its clashing cultures, and its heartbreaking crises” (Geraldine Brooks, author of March). “Her story began with a miracle.” On the Caribbean island of Saint Domingue, an island consumed by the flames of revolution, a senseless attack leaves only one survivor—an infant girl. She falls into the hands of two French émigrés, Henri and Solange Fournier, who take the beautiful child they call Ruth to the bustling American city of Savannah. What follows is the sweeping tale of Ruth’s life as shaped by her strong-willed mistress and other larger-than-life personalities she encounters in the South: Jehu Glen, a free black man with whom Ruth falls madly in love; the shabbily genteel family that first hires Ruth as Mammy; Solange’s daughter Ellen and the rough Irishman, Gerald O’Hara, whom Ellen chooses to marry; the Butler family of Charleston and their shocking connection to Mammy Ruth; and finally Scarlett O’Hara—the irrepressible Southern belle Mammy raises from birth. As we witness the difficult coming of age felt by three generations of women, gifted storyteller Donald McCaig reveals a portrait of Mammy that is both nuanced and poignant, at once a proud woman and a captive, a strict disciplinarian who has never experienced freedom herself. But despite the cruelties of a world that has decreed her a slave, Mammy endures, a rock in the river of time. She loves with a ferocity that would astonish those around her if they knew it. And she holds tight even to those who have been lost in the ravages of her days. Set against the backdrop of the South from the 1820s until the dawn of the Civil War, here is a remarkable story of fortitude, heartbreak, and indomitable will—and a tale that will forever illuminate your reading of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind.

The Construction Of Irish Identity In American Literature

Author: Christopher Dowd
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136902414
Size: 46.92 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 496
Download Read Online
This book examines the development of literary constructions of Irish-American identity from the mid-nineteenth century arrival of the Famine generation through the Great Depression. It goes beyond an analysis of negative Irish stereotypes and shows how Irish characters became the site of intense cultural debate regarding American identity, with some writers imagining Irishness to be the antithesis of Americanness, but others suggesting Irishness to be a path to Americanization. This study emphasizes the importance of considering how a sense of Irishness was imagined by both Irish-American writers conscious of the process of self-definition as well as non-Irish writers responsive to shifting cultural concerns regarding ethnic others. It analyzes specific iconic Irish-American characters including Mark Twain’s Huck Finn and Margaret Mitchell’s Scarlet O’Hara, as well as lesser-known Irish monsters who lurked in the American imagination such as T.S. Eliot’s Sweeney and Frank Norris’ McTeague. As Dowd argues, in contemporary American society, Irishness has been largely absorbed into a homogenous white culture, and as a result, it has become a largely invisible ethnicity to many modern literary critics. Too often, they simply do not see Irishness or do not think it relevant, and as a result, many Irish-American characters have been de-ethnicized in the critical literature of the past century. This volume reestablishes the importance of Irish ethnicity to many characters that have come to be misread as generically white and shows how Irishness is integral to their stories.

Barren Ground

Author: Ellen Glasgow
Publisher: Bailey Press
ISBN: 1447412222
Size: 38.67 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 4419
Download Read Online
Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.