Ambiguous Justice

Author: Vanessa Ann Gunther
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 9780870137792
Size: 65.94 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5155
Download Read Online
The ways in which the legal system was used as a means to harass Native Americans is discussed in an insightful examination of how nineteenth-century American society had little sympathy for the plight of Native Americans. Original.

A Companion To The Anthropology Of American Indians

Author: Thomas Biolsi
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1405156120
Size: 74.76 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 1669
Download Read Online
This Companion is comprised of 27 original contributions by leading scholars in the field and summarizes the state of anthropological knowledge of Indian peoples, as well as the history that got us to this point. Surveys the full range of American Indian anthropology: from ecological and political-economic questions to topics concerning religion, language, and expressive culture Each chapter provides definitive coverage of its topic, as well as situating ethnographic and ethnohistorical data into larger frameworks Explores anthropology’s contribution to knowledge, its historic and ongoing complicities with colonialism, and its political and ethical obligations toward the people 'studied'

Chief Joseph

Author: Vanessa Gunther
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313379203
Size: 67.81 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 5027
Download Read Online
"Chief Joseph: A Biography" explores the world of the Nez Perce Indians from their entrance into the Columbia Plateau through their relations with the expanding United States. It recounts their attempt to accommodate the rapidly changing world around them, and it follows the life of Chief Joseph, one of their greatest peace leaders. Readers will learn how interactions with Lewis and Clark at the beginning of the 19th century and the subsequent duplicity of white settlers and their government radically changed the Nez Perce way of life--and influenced Joseph's rise. Separating the real Chief Joseph from the myths that have grown around him, the book shows how he shepherded the Nez Perce people through the ordeals that confronted them, including the loss of their land and freedom and the persistent threats to the culture that had guided the Nez Perce for centuries.

Masculindians

Author: Sam McKegney
Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press
ISBN: 0887554423
Size: 10.60 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6722
Download Read Online
What does it mean to be an Indigenous man today? Between October 2010 and May 2013, Sam McKegney conducted interviews with leading Indigenous artists, critics, activists, and elders on the subject of Indigenous manhood. In offices, kitchens, and coffee shops, and once in a car driving down the 401, McKegney and his participants tackled crucial questions about masculine self-worth and how to foster balanced and empowered gender relations. Masculindians captures twenty of these conversations in a volume that is intensely personal, yet speaks across generations, geography, and gender boundaries. As varied as their speakers, the discussions range from culture, history, and world view to gender theory, artistic representations, and activist interventions. They speak of possibility and strength, of beauty and vulnerability. They speak of sensuality, eroticism, and warriorhood, and of the corrosive influence of shame, racism, and violence. Firmly grounding Indigenous continuance in sacred landscapes, interpersonal reciprocity, and relations with other-than-human kin, these conversations honour and embolden the generative potential of healthy Indigenous masculinities.

The Clay We Are Made Of

Author: Susan M. Hill
Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press
ISBN: 088755458X
Size: 39.82 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 747
Download Read Online
If one seeks to understand Haudenosaunee (Six Nations) history, one must consider the history of Haudenosaunee land. For countless generations prior to European contact, land and territory informed Haudenosaunee thought and philosophy, and was a primary determinant of Haudenosaunee identity. In The Clay We Are Made Of, Susan M. Hill presents a revolutionary retelling of the history of the Grand River Haudenosaunee from their Creation Story through European contact to contemporary land claims negotiations. She incorporates Indigenous theory, Fourth world post-colonialism, and Amerindian autohistory, along with Haudenosaunee languages, oral records, and wampum strings to provide the most comprehensive account of the Haudenosaunee’s relationship to their land. Hill outlines the basic principles and historical knowledge contained within four key epics passed down through Haudenosaunee cultural history. She highlights the political role of women in land negotiations and dispels their misrepresentation in the scholarly canon. She guides the reader through treaty relationships with Dutch, French, and British settler nations, including the Kaswentha/Two-Row Wampum (the precursor to all future Haudenosaunee-European treaties), the Covenant Chain, the Nanfan Treaty, and the Haldimand Proclamation, and concludes with a discussion of the current problematic relationships between the Grand River Haudenosaunee, the Crown, and the Canadian government.

Centering Anishinaabeg Studies

Author: Jill Doerfler
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 1609173538
Size: 57.19 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 6685
Download Read Online
For the Anishinaabeg people, who span a vast geographic region from the Great Lakes to the Plains and beyond, stories are vessels of knowledge. They are bagijiganan, offerings of the possibilities within Anishinaabeg life. Existing along a broad narrative spectrum, from aadizookaanag (traditional or sacred narratives) to dibaajimowinan (histories and news)—as well as everything in between—storytelling is one of the central practices and methods of individual and community existence. Stories create and understand, survive and endure, revitalize and persist. They honor the past, recognize the present, and provide visions of the future. In remembering, (re)making, and (re)writing stories, Anishinaabeg storytellers have forged a well-traveled path of agency, resistance, and resurgence. Respecting this tradition, this groundbreaking anthology features twenty-four contributors who utilize creative and critical approaches to propose that this people’s stories carry dynamic answers to questions posed within Anishinaabeg communities, nations, and the world at large. Examining a range of stories and storytellers across time and space, each contributor explores how narratives form a cultural, political, and historical foundation for Anishinaabeg Studies. Written by Anishinaabeg and non-Anishinaabeg scholars, storytellers, and activists, these essays draw upon the power of cultural expression to illustrate active and ongoing senses of Anishinaabeg life. They are new and dynamic bagijiganan, revealing a viable and sustainable center for Anishinaabeg Studies, what it has been, what it is, what it can be.

Curator Of Ephemera At The New Museum For Archaic Media

Author: Heid E. Erdrich
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 1628952989
Size: 41.23 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2159
Download Read Online
Heid E. Erdrich writes from the present into the future where human anxiety lives. Many of her poems engage ekphrasis around the visual work of contemporary artists who, like Erdrich, are Anishinaabe. Poems in this collection also curate unmountable exhibits in not-yet-existent museums devoted to the ephemera of communication and technology. A central trope is the mixtape, an ephemeral form that Erdrich explores in its role of carrying the romantic angst of American couples. These poems recognize how our love of technology and how the extraction industries on indigenous lands that technology requires threaten our future and obscure the realities of indigenous peoples who know what it is to survive apocalypse. Deeply eco-poetic poems extend beyond the page in poemeos, collaboratively made poem films accessible in the text through the new but already archaic use of QR codes. Collaborative poems highlighting lessons in Anishinaabemowin also broaden the context of Erdrich’s work. Despite how little communications technology has helped to bring people toward understanding one another, these poems speak to the keen human yearning to connect as they urge engagement of the image, the moment, the sensual, and the real.

The Counselling Speeches Of Jim K N Pit Ht W Ana K Pimw W Hahk Okak Skihk Mowina

Author: Freda Ahenakew
Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press
ISBN: 0887553710
Size: 69.54 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 6409
Download Read Online
The Counselling Speeches of Jim Ka-Nipitehtew (Ana ka-pimwewehahk okakeskihkemowina) is one of the titles in the Publications of the Algonquian Text Society series. Jim Ka-Nipitehtew was a respected Cree Elder from Onion Lake, Saskatchewan, who spoke only Cree and provided these original counselling discourses. The book offers the speeches in Cree syllabics and in Roman Orthography as well as an English translation and commentary. The Elder offers guidance for First Nations people in these eight speeches that cover the proper performance of ceremonies, words of encouragement for the youth, information about collecting medicinal plants, directions for proper behaviour of men toward women, proper preparations for the Pipe ceremony, the role of the Pipestem in the Making of Treaty 6, the importance of tobacco, and examples of improper ritual behaviour in ceremonies. One of the most important speeches is the narrative of the Cree record for the treaty negotiations that took place in the summer of 1876. It was originally transmitted by Jim Ka-Nipitehtew's father directly to him and the authors comment on this remarkable chain of transmission. The book contains a Cree-English and an English-Cree Glossary. This is an important resource for Cree linguistics as well as those interested in understanding the Cree perspective of Treaty 6.

The Murder Of Joe White

Author: Erik M. Redix
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 1628950323
Size: 22.51 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6944
Download Read Online
In 1894 Wisconsin game wardens Horace Martin and Josiah Hicks were dispatched to arrest Joe White, an Ojibwe ogimaa (chief), for hunting deer out of season and off-reservation. Martin and Hicks found White and made an effort to arrest him. When White showed reluctance to go with the wardens, they started beating him; he attempted to flee, and the wardens shot him in the back, fatally wounding him. Both Martin and Hicks were charged with manslaughter in local county court, and they were tried by an all-white jury. A gripping historical study, The Murder of Joe White contextualizes this event within decades of struggle of White’s community at Rice Lake to resist removal to the Lac Courte Oreilles Reservation, created in 1854 at the Treaty of La Pointe. While many studies portray American colonialism as defined by federal policy, The Murder of Joe White seeks a much broader understanding of colonialism, including the complex role of state and local governments as well as corporations. All of these facets of American colonialism shaped the events that led to the death of Joe White and the struggle of the Ojibwe to resist removal to the reservation.