Americans In Occupied Belgium 1914 1918

Author: Ed Klekowski
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 1476614873
Size: 68.25 MB
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Belgium in the First World War--the first country invaded, the longest occupied, and when the war finally ended, the first forgotten. In 1914, Belgium was home to a large American colony which included representatives of American companies, artists, writers and diplomats with the American Legation. After the invasion, American journalists and adventurers flocked there to follow the action; military restrictions on travel were less stringent than in England or France. As the most industrialized country in Europe, Belgium depended upon trade and food imports to support its economy. The war isolated Belgium and wholesale starvation was imminent by the fall of 1914. Herbert Hoover and his Commission for Relief in Belgium raised funds to purchase and import food to sustain Belgium and, eventually, Occupied France as well. Idealistic American volunteers (including some Rhodes scholars) supervised food distribution in the occupation zone. Along the Western Front in Belgium, hundreds of Americans served (illegally) in the British and Canadian armies. This book tells the story of the German invasion, occupation and retreat from the perspective of Americans who were there.

Edith Wharton And Mary Roberts Rinehart At The Western Front 1915

Author: Ed Klekowski
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 147663212X
Size: 22.11 MB
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By 1915, the Western Front was a 450–mile line of trenches, barbed wire and concrete bunkers, stretching across Europe. Attempts to break the stalemate were murderous and futile. Press censorship was extreme—no one wanted the carnage reported. Remakably, the Allied command gave two intrepid American women, Edith Wharton and Mary Roberts Rinehart, permission to visit the front and report on what they saw. Their travels are reconstructed from their own published accounts, Rinehart’s unpublished day-by-day notes, and the writings of other journalists who toured the front in 1915. The authors’ explorations of the places Wharton and Rinehart visited serves as a travel guide to the Western Front.

Eyewitnesses To The Great War

Author: Ed Klekowski
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786492007
Size: 48.97 MB
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Beginning with the novelist Edith Wharton, who toured the front in her Mercedes in 1915, this book describes the wartime experiences of American idealists (and a few rogues) on the Western Front and concludes with the doughboys' experiences under General Pershing. Americans were "over there" from the war's beginning in August 1914, and because America was neutral until April 1917, they saw the war from both the French and German lines. Since most of the Americans who served, regardless of which side they were on, were in Champagne and Lorraine, this sector is the focus. Excerpts from.

America And The Great War

Author: D. Clayton James
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118822935
Size: 62.10 MB
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In America and the Great War, 1914-1920, the accomplished writing team of D. Clayton James and Anne Sharp Wells provides a succinct account of the principal military, political, and social developments in United States History as the nation responded to, and was changed by, a world in crisis. A forthright examination of America's unprecedented military commitment and actions abroad, America and the Great War includes insights into the personalities of key Allied officers and civilian leaders as well as the evolution of the new American "citizen soldier." Full coverage is given to President Wilson's beleaguered second term, the experience of Americans-including women, minorities, and recent arrivals-on the home front, and the lasting changes left in the Great War's wake.

The Kaiser S American

Author: Ed Klekowski
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781539382423
Size: 31.94 MB
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July, 1914. Paul Meyer is in a lot of trouble. Following a bungled bank robbery, he spends his days lying low, working in his father's Brooklyn motor garage... terrified of the day someone will spot him and have him hauled away by the cops. And then he gets his golden ticket: War in Europe. Being of German descent, Paul seizes the chance to get away from America and fight for 'the Fatherland'. Who would recognise him there? Fighting for the 'Hun' does not turn out to be what Paul had imagined and the more he learns of Kaiser Wilhelm II, Supreme War Lord, the less supportive he becomes of the German cause. When his airship takes a dive on a bombing mission, 'Seemann Meyer' grabs another chance to start over. But now he could be arrested and shot as a deserter. With two crimes under his belt, Paul finds himself navigating his own minefield to survive the war. In the months that follow, Paul becomes witness to major events of the First World War, as the city of Antwerp falls to German forces. Paul's fortunes - or misfortunes - take him from being a hunted criminal to German soldier to American journalist and spy to boot, his adventures leading him deep into the heart of German politics. But will this wanted man's luck last? In the chaos of wartime, will Paul Meyer continue to dodge arrest? How will things finally turn out for the Kaiser's American? This fascinating story reveals the plight and experiences of soldiers and civilians caught up in the highly volatile early stages of the First World War and depicts the humanitarian side to the history of these events. Ed Klekowski has spent lengthy periods in Belgium and France exploring places relevant to the First World War. He and his wife Libby Klekowski have produced two hour-long documentaries on the war for American Public Television and written two books about Americans who were in Belgium and France prior to America's entry into the war in 1917. Endeavour Press is the UK's leading independent digital publisher. For more information on our titles please sign up to our newsletter at www.endeavourpress.com. Each week you will receive updates on free and discounted ebooks. Follow us on Twitter: @EndeavourPress and on Facebook via http://on.fb.me/1HweQV7. We are always interested in hearing from our readers. Endeavour Press believes that the future is now.

America History And Life

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 16.31 MB
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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

The Victory At Sea

Author: Rear Adm. William Snowden Sims
Publisher: Naval Institute Press
ISBN: 1682472000
Size: 25.63 MB
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In 1921 Rear Admiral William Sowden Sims won the Pulitzer prize in history for Victory at Sea. The commander of U.S. naval forces operating in European waters during the WWI, Sims offers an authoritative account of the U.S. Navy's role in the war. Rear Admiral Sims explains the significance of submarine warfare, and its role in the defeat of Germany. The U.S. Navy's campaign was shrouded in secrecy at the time. Admiral Sims, head of the Naval War College when WWI broke out, was a brilliant gunnery reformer and noted Anglophile whose service in London ideally suited him to compose this history of the naval campaigns of the Great War. He was placed in charge of American naval forces in Europe for the duration of the war. Sims was born of American parents in Port Hope, Canada, 15 October 1858. Educated at Annapolis from 1876 to 1880, he first won fame as a lieutenant on duty in China in 1902. After being rebuffed by his superiors when he made suggestions for improvement in gunnery practice, he is reported to have gone over their heads and claimed directly to President Theodore Roosevelt that American gunnery was hopelessly inaccurate. Roosevelt called him back to become inspector of naval target practice. Admiral Sims died in 1922. He served his country for 46 years.

The Great War And American Foreign Policy 1914 24

Author: Robert E. Hannigan
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812293282
Size: 13.39 MB
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World War I constituted a milestone in the development of the United States as a world power. As the European powers exhausted themselves during the conflict, the U.S. government deployed its growing economic leverage, its military might, and its diplomacy to shape the outcome of the war and to influence the future of international relations. In The Great War and American Foreign Policy, 1914-1924, Robert E. Hannigan challenges the conventional belief that the United States entered World War I only because its hand was forced, and he disputes the claim that Washington was subsequently driven by a desire to make the world "safe for democracy." Democratic President Woodrow Wilson's rhetoric emphasized peace, self-determination, and international cooperation. But his foreign policy, Hannigan claims, is better understood if analyzed against the backdrop of American policy—not only toward Europe, but also toward East Asia and the rest of the western hemisphere—as it had been developing since the turn of the twentieth century. On the broadest level, Wilson sought to shore up and stabilize an international order promoted and presided over by London since the early 1800s, this in the conviction that under such conditions the United States would inevitably ascend to a global position comparable to, if not eclipsing, that of Great Britain. Hannigan argues, moreover, that these fundamental objectives continued to guide Wilson's Republican successors in their efforts to stabilize the postwar world. The book reexamines the years when the United States was ostensibly neutral (1914-17), the subsequent period of American military involvement (1917-18), the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, the ensuing battle for ratification of the Treaty of Versailles (in 1919-20), and the activities of Wilson's successors—culminating with the Dawes Plan of 1924.