Border Wars

Author: K. Adam Powell
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 9780810848399
Size: 15.37 MB
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An in-depth look at the players, games, and moments that have shaped the first half-century of ACC football, this compendium covers every detail from its five national Championship teams to the scandals that have rocked programs at Clemson and Florida State. The book also includes the coaching records and season standings of ACC football teams from 1953 to 2002.

Lyman Bostock

Author: K. Adam Powell
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442252065
Size: 49.54 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Lyman Bostock was a professional baseball player for the Minnesota Twins and the California Angels in the 1970s. Many believed he was good enough to win multiple batting titles, yet his murder meant it would never come to be. This book tells the story of Bostock’s humble beginnings, his too-brief baseball career, and his tragic death.

Empire Of The Summer Moon

Author: S. C. Gwynne
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416597158
Size: 72.72 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. S.C. Gwynne’s Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. So effective were the Comanches that they forced the creation of the Texas Rangers and account for the advent of the new weapon specifically designed to fight them: the six-gun. The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being. Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a lovely nine-year-old girl with cornflower-blue eyes who was kidnapped by Comanches from the far Texas frontier in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the "White Squaw" who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend. S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. Empire of the Summer Moon announces him as a major new writer of American history.

Poor White

Author: Sherwood Anderson
Publisher: 1st World Publishing
ISBN: 1421815974
Size: 35.36 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - Hugh McVey was born in a little hole of a town stuck on a mud bank on the western shore of the Mississippi River in the State of Missouri. It was a miserable place in which to be born. With the exception of a narrow strip of black mud along the river, the land for ten miles back from the town - called in derision by river men "Mudcat Landing" - was almost entirely worthless and unproductive. The soil, yellow, shallow and stony, was tilled, in Hugh's time, by a race of long gaunt men who seemed as exhausted and no-account as the land on which they lived. They were chronically dis-couraged, and the merchants and artisans of the town were in the same state. The merchants, who ran their stores - poor tumble-down ramshackle affairs - on the credit system, could not get pay for the goods they handed out over their counters and the artisans, the shoemakers, carpenters and harnessmakers, could not get pay for the work they did. Only the town's two saloons prospered. The saloon keepers sold their wares for cash and, as the men of the town and the farmers who drove into town felt that without drink life was unbearable, cash always could be found for the purpose of getting drunk.

History Of Anson County North Carolina 1750 1976

Author: Mary Louise Medley
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806347554
Size: 77.51 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Anson County, which at its formation in 1750 encompassed all of central and western North Carolina and portions of South Carolina, is the parent of the North Carolina counties of Mecklenburg, Montgomery, Richmond, Rowan, and Union. The work at hand, written by journalist and historian Mary Medley and sponsored by the Anson County Historical Society, is the only comprehensive history of Anson County. The narrative spans over 225 years of the county's growth from a vast wilderness to a thriving industrial and agricultural community.