Calhoun County

Author: Kimberly O'Dell
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738589985
Size: 77.84 MB
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Calhoun County has a diverse and unique history. Chief Ladiga and his Creek tribe first settled in the northeastern half of the county. By the early 1800s, settlers from Georgia, Tennessee, and South Carolina came to this scenic mountainous area to farm in the county's rich valleys. After the Treaty of Cusseta removed the Creeks west of the Mississippi in 1832, more settlers began arriving. In 1833, Benton County was incorporated into the state of Alabama and Jacksonville was made the county seat. Oxford, or "Lick-Skillet," was a frontier town at the time, and Piedmont, or "Cross Plains," was an intersection for the two stagecoach routes. By the time of the Civil War, the county would change its name to Calhoun County in honor of South Carolina statesman John C. Calhoun. In 1872, two northern industrialists, Samuel Noble and Gen. Daniel Tyler, created their "model city" in Anniston, which began a period of great growth in the county.

Anniston Revisited

Author: Kimberly O’Dell
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439653461
Size: 73.49 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Nestled in the Piedmont region of the Appalachian Mountains, the small farming community of Pine Ankle was established in the 1830s on the former lands of the Creek Nation. In 1872, industrialists Samuel Noble and Daniel Tyler purchased the land for their Woodstock Iron Company, and in 1883 the town was opened to the public as Annie’s Town. It grew rapidly, and by the early 20th century Anniston was not only the seat of Calhoun County, but also home to numerous textile and iron industries as well as a thriving military complex. The vintage photographs in Images of America: Anniston Revisited showcase the daily lives of Annistonians and Fort McClellan soldiers during a time when Noble Street was a bustling urban center. Anniston’s homes, schools, and community centers are featured, along with the expanded downtown area and Fort McClellan, to paint a vivid portrait of “The Model City.”

Calhoun County

Author: George Anne Cormier
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738596604
Size: 53.16 MB
Format: PDF
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Calhoun County is a regional playground along the mid-Texas coast. Located where US Highway 87 begins and the Guadalupe River ends, the county was organized in 1846. Bordered by inland bays and the Gulf of Mexico, the area boasts of more than 560 miles of coastline, making it a hot spot for tourists and boaters. Easy access to the Gulf via the Port O'Connor jetties makes this one of the most popular fishing resorts on the entire Texas coast. With the abundance of water, coastal prairies, and marshes, Calhoun County is also favorite place for birders and photographers and is home to more than 400 species of birds and eight birding sites along the Texas Birding Trail. The county's visitor-friendly population of 21,000 even doubles on some weekends, such as the Fourth of July.

Abbeville County

Author:
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738516721
Size: 57.55 MB
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With beginnings dating back as far as the 1700s, Abbeville County, South Carolina, has a history that represents a rich and colorful tapestry of the South Carolina Upcountry. Formally organized into a unit of state government in 1800, Abbeville District extended from Savannah to the Saluda Rivers, but modern Abbeville County includes Abbeville, Calhoun Falls, Antreville, Donalds, Due West, and Lowndesville. Each of these communities has its own distinct landmarks and prominent events, such as Jefferson Davis's last War Cabinet meeting in the city of Abbeville, the moment that dissolved the Confederacy and earned the city the nickname "Birthplace and Deathbed of the Confederacy." Many of the families living here today are descended from the first settlers, and even the famous John C. Calhoun was a native son of Abbeville County.

Calhoun County

Author: Darcy Dougherty Maulsby
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439653267
Size: 63.99 MB
Format: PDF
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View the history of small-town, rural Iowa through the eyes of those who lived it. Images of America: Calhoun County showcases this unique heritage through remarkable glimpses into the past and intriguing stories that bring these images to life. Discover the region’s pioneer heritage, the birth of the railroad and prairie towns, and the growth of some of most productive farms in the world. Calhoun County claims two nationally acclaimed authors as native sons, welcomed Babe Ruth in 1940 (but not on the baseball field), and was the target of a bank robbery by Bonnie and Clyde in the 1930s. Calhoun County offers a well-researched pictorial journey designed for native Iowans, transplanted Iowans, and those curious about the evolution of small towns and farms in the Midwest.

Cross Country Cat

Author: Mary Calhoun
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0688065198
Size: 30.76 MB
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What kind of cat would go sliding off on skis, and who'd believe it anyway? When the family accidentally leaves Henry, their sassy Siamese, behind at the ski lodge, he takes matters into his own paws in this beguiling adventure.

Old Southern Apples

Author: Creighton Lee Calhoun
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603583122
Size: 46.73 MB
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A book that became an instant classic when it first appeared in 1995, Old Southern Apples is an indispensable reference for fruit lovers everywhere, especially those who live in the southern United States. Out of print for several years, this newly revised and expanded edition now features descriptions of some 1,800 apple varieties that either originated in the South or were widely grown there before 1928. Author Lee Calhoun is one of the foremost figures in apple conservation in America. This masterwork reflects his knowledge and personal experience over more than thirty years, as he sought out and grew hundreds of classic apples, including both legendary varieties (like Nickajack and Magnum Bonum) and little-known ones (like Buff and Cullasaga). Representing our common orchard heritage, many of these apples are today at risk of disappearing from our national table. Illustrated with more than 120 color images of classic apples from the National Agricultural Library’s collection of watercolor paintings, Old Southern Apples is a fascinating and beautiful reference and gift book. In addition to A-to-Z descriptions of apple varieties, both extant and extinct, Calhoun provides a brief history of apple culture in the South, and includes practical information on growing apples and on their traditional uses.

Anniston

Author: Kimberly O'Dell
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738506012
Size: 73.39 MB
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Once known as Pine Ankle and sparsely populated with farms, Anniston, Alabama, has seen a multitude of changes over the course of its history. Founded on land that was originally home to Native Americans, the town was created by Samuel Noble and General Daniel Tyler as a "model city" for their Woodstock Iron Company in 1872, and not opened to the public until 1883. Rapid growth in the late nineteenth century brought not only new industries to the area but also Anniston's designation as seat of Calhoun County and an expansion of the entire downtown area. The vintage photographs within these pages reveal what life was like in Anniston in days gone by, highlighting key figures in the town's development as well as the everyday people who have lived and worked in the community for generations. Readers will discover the new industries that sprang up after the Oxford Iron Furnace was burned by Union forces in 1865, and the effects of the population boom of the late nineteenth century. Anniston's homes, schools, and churches are featured in this pictorial retrospective, as well as the town's role as an important military site, with Camp Shipp, Fort McClellan, Pelham Range, and the Anniston Ordinance Depot all located within the town's vicinity over the past century.

Democracy Rising

Author: Peter F. Lau
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813159121
Size: 10.27 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Considered by many historians to be the birthplace of the Confederacy, South Carolina experienced one of the longest and most turbulent Reconstruction periods of all the southern states. After the Civil War, white supremacist leadership in the state fiercely resisted the efforts of freed slaves to secure full citizenship rights and to remake society based upon an expansive vision of freedom forged in slavery and the crucible of war. Despite numerous obstacles, African Americans achieved remarkable social and political advances in the ten years following the war, including the establishment of the state's first publicly-funded school system and health care for the poor. Through their efforts, the state's political process and social fabric became more democratic. Peter F. Lau traces the civil rights movement in South Carolina from Reconstruction through the early twenty-first century. He stresses that the movement was shaped by local, national, and international circumstances in which individuals worked to redefine and expand the meaning and practice of democracy beyond the borders of their own state. Contrary to recent scholars who separate civil rights claims from general calls for economic justice, Lau asserts that African American demands for civil rights have been inseparable from broader demands for a redistribution of social and economic power. Using the tension between rights possession and rights application as his organizing theme, Lau fundamentally revises our understanding of the civil rights movement in America. In addition to considering South Carolina's pivotal role in the national civil rights movement, Lau offers a comprehensive analysis of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) during the height of its power and influence, from 1910 through the years following Brown v. Board of Education (1954). During this time, the NAACP worked to ensure the rights guaranteed to African Americans by the 14th and 15th amendments and facilitated the emergence of a broad-based movement that included many of the nation's rural and most marginalized people. By examining events that occurred in South Carolina and the impact of the activities of the NAACP, Democracy Rising upends traditional interpretations of the civil rights movement in America. In their place, Lau offers an innovative way to understand the struggle for black equality by tracing the movement of people, institutions, and ideas across boundaries of region, nation, and identity. Ultimately, the book illustrates how conflicts caused by the state's history of racial exclusion and discrimination continue to shape modern society.

Dallas County

Author: Darcy Dougherty-Maulsby
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439662398
Size: 40.73 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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No Iowa county has influenced American history more than Dallas County. It propelled Harry Truman to an unlikely victory in the 1948 presidential campaign, following a fiery speech he delivered to 100,000 farmers on a sweltering September day at the National Plowing Match near Dexter. Just 15 years earlier, a shoot-out near Dexfield Park marked the beginning of the end for infamous outlaws Bonnie and Clyde and the notorious Barrow Gang. Dallas County, located just west of Des Moines, has produced several major-league baseball players (among them Bob Feller and Hal Manders), a US congressman (David Young), and Nile Kinnick, the 1939 Heisman Trophy winner and University of Iowa football legend whose grandfather George Clarke, of Adel, served as Iowa’s governor from 1913 to 1917. Today, Dallas County is one of the fastest-growing counties in America and remains a region of opportunity with a rich heritage of small-town living, farming, coal mining, and the immigrant experience.