Governing Urban Economies

Author: Neil Bradford
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442626275
Size: 29.19 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Today more than ever, cities matter to the economic and social well-being of the vast majority of Canadians. Canada's urban centers are simultaneously the engines of the national economy and the places where the risks of social exclusion are most concentrated, making innovative and inclusive urban governance an urgent national priority. Governing Urban Economies is the first detailed scholarly examination of relations among governmental and community-based actors in Canadian city-regions. Comparing patterns of municipal-community relations and federal-provincial interactions across city-regions, this volume tracks the ways in which urban coalitions tackle complex economic and social challenges. Featuring an inter-disciplinary group of established and up-and-coming scholars, this collection breaks new ground in the Canadian urban politics literature and will appeal to urbanists working in a range of national contexts.

Growing Urban Economies

Author: David A. Wolfe
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442629460
Size: 70.32 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Even in a globalizing, knowledge-based economy, cities remain engines of growth, innovation, and diversity. Increasingly, they are also active participants in the creation of the social and political conditions necessary to create a thriving community. The Innovation, Creativity, and Governance in Canadian City-Regions series is a focused analysis of how developments at the local and regional level affect these three key determinants of future prosperity. Growing Urban Economies summarizes its conclusions in a single volume that presents an overview of the evidence and its implications. A rich and nuanced analysis of the interplay of social, political, and economic factors in thirteen Canadian city-regions, large and small, this collection integrates research focusing on innovation, creativity and talent-retention, and governance in order to understand the distinctive experience of each region. A valuable cross-section of city-region development in a variety of circumstances, Growing Urban Economies offers important insights into the way in which local conditions affect urban economies around the world.

Entrepreneurial Learning City Regions

Author: Judith James
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319611305
Size: 75.15 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book proposes an alternative strategy to improve and sustain prosperity, through the creation of an entrepreneurial culture in learning cities or city regions. The edited collection provides insights into how entrepreneurship, education, job creation and social inclusion can be aligned through entrepreneurial learning, in the context of territorial development. With rich and varied contributions from a wide field, including policy makers, entrepreneurs, an investment banker, leaders of universities and councils, the voluntary sector, scientists, educators and students, it reviews and assesses how learning cities and regions may become more prosperous by investing in the development of entrepreneurial skills throughout lifelong learning. Reinforced by examples on developing and retaining entrepreneurial people, this book contributes to our understanding of how entrepreneurial learning can be fostered in different city and city-region contexts. It makes an interesting contribution to the field in terms of mapping out complex issues and testing the practical validity of the concept, while also providing rich and insightful case studies centred on the Welsh experience with entrepreneurial learning city regions. The high quality international contributions demonstrate the new worldwide interest in developing an entrepreneurial culture for the benefit of a city or region, rather than an entrepreneurial mind-set for individual benefit. This fascinating subject will be of interest to many social scientists, policymakers, and practitioners. It will be found especially valuable for professionals involved in economic, inclusive and sustainable city or regional development.

Leading The Inclusive City

Author: Robin Hambleton
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 144731185X
Size: 21.46 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Cities are often seen as helpless victims in a global flow of events and many view growing inequality in cities as inevitable. This engaging book rejects this gloomy prognosis and argues that imaginative place-based leadership can enable citizens to shape the urban future in accordance with progressive values – advancing social justice, promoting care for the environment and bolstering community empowerment. This international and comparative book, written by an experienced author, shows how inspirational civic leaders are making a major difference in cities across the world. The analysis provides practical lessons for local leaders and a significant contribution to thinking on public service innovation for anyone who wants to change urban society for the better.

Innovating In Urban Economies

Author: David A. Wolfe
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442614765
Size: 45.99 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In a globalizing, knowledge-based economy, innovation and creative capacity lead to economic prosperity. Starting in 2006, the Innovation Systems Research Network began a six year-long study on how city-regions in Canada were surviving and thriving in a globalized world. That study resulted in the “Innovation, Creativity, and Governance in Canadian City-Regions” series, which examines the impact of innovation, talent, and institutions on sixteen city-regions across Canada. This volume explores how the social dynamics that influence innovation and knowledge flows in Canadian city-regions contribute to transformation and long-term growth. With case studies examining cities of all sizes, from Toronto to Moncton, Innovating in Urban Economies analyzes the impact of size, location, and the regional economy on innovation and knowledge in Canada's cities.

Innovating In Urban Economies

Author: David A. Wolfe
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442666978
Size: 25.68 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 656
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In a globalizing, knowledge-based economy, innovation and creative capacity lead to economic prosperity. Starting in 2006, the Innovation Systems Research Network began a six year-long study on how city-regions in Canada were surviving and thriving in a globalized world. That study resulted in the “Innovation, Creativity, and Governance in Canadian City-Regions” series, which examines the impact of innovation, talent, and institutions on sixteen city-regions across Canada. This volume explores how the social dynamics that influence innovation and knowledge flows in Canadian city-regions contribute to transformation and long-term growth. With case studies examining cities of all sizes, from Toronto to Moncton, Innovating in Urban Economies analyzes the impact of size, location, and the regional economy on innovation and knowledge in Canada’s cities.

Climate Change In Cities

Author: Sara Hughes
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319650033
Size: 34.19 MB
Format: PDF
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This book presents pioneering work on a range of innovative practices, experiments, and ideas that are becoming an integral part of urban climate change governance in the 21st century. Theoretically, the book builds on nearly two decades of scholarships identifying the emergence of new urban actors, spaces and political dynamics in response to climate change priorities. However, it further articulates and applies the concepts associated with urban climate change governance by bridging formerly disparate disciplines and approaches. Empirically, the chapters investigate new multi-level urban governance arrangements from around the world, and leverage the insights they provide for both theory and practice. Cities - both as political and material entities - are increasingly playing a critical role in shaping the trajectory and impacts of climate change action. However, their policy, planning, and governance responses to climate change are fraught with tension and contradictions. While on one hand local actors play a central role in designing institutions, infrastructures, and behaviors that drive decarbonization and adaptation to changing climatic conditions, their options and incentives are inextricably enmeshed within broader political and economic processes. Resolving these tensions and contradictions is likely to require innovative and multi-level approaches to governing climate change in the city: new interactions, new political actors, new ways of coordinating and mobilizing resources, and new frameworks and technical capacities for decision making. We focus explicitly on those innovations that produce new relationships between levels of government, between government and citizens, and among governments, the private sector, and transnational and civil society actors. A more comprehensive understanding is needed of the innovative approaches being used to navigate the complex networks and relationships that constitute contemporary multi-level urban climate change governance. Debra Roberts, Co-Chair, Working Group II, IPCC 6th Assessment Report (AR6) and Acting Head, Sustainable and Resilient City Initiatives, Durban, South Africa “Climate Change in Cities offers a refreshingly frank view of how complex cities and city processes really are.” Christopher Gore, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University, Canada “This book is a rare and welcome contribution engaging critically with questions about cities as central actors in multilevel climate governance but it does so recognizing that there are lessons from cities in both the Global North and South.” Harriet Bulkeley, Professor of Geography, Durham University, United Kingdom “This timely collection provides new insights into how cities can put their rhetoric into action on the ground and explores just how this promise can be realised in cities across the world - from California to Canada, India to Indonesia.”

The Polycentric Metropolis

Author: Peter Hall
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136547681
Size: 54.12 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A new 21st century urban phenomenon is emerging: the networked polycentric mega-city region. Developed around one or more cities of global status, it is characterized by a cluster of cities and towns, physically separate but intensively networked in a complex spatial division of labour. This book describes and analyses eight such regions in North West Europe. For the first time, this work shows how businesses interrelate and communicate in geographical space - within each region, between them, and with the wider world. It goes on to demonstrate the profound consequences for spatial planning and regional development in Europe - and, by implication, other similar urban regions of the world. The Polycentric Metropolis introduces the concept of a mega-city region, analyses its characteristics, examines the issues surrounding regional identities, and discusses policy ramifications and outcomes for infrastructure, transport systems and regulation. Packed with high quality maps, case study data and written in a clear style by highly experienced authors, this will be an insightful and significant analysis suitable for professionals in urban planning and policy, environmental consultancies, business and investment communities, technical libraries, and students in urban studies, geography, economics and town/spatial planning.

Suburban Governance

Author: Pierre Hamel
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442614005
Size: 28.42 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Suburban Governance: A Global View is a groundbreaking set of essays by leading urban scholars that assess how governance regulates the creation of the world's suburban spaces and everyday life within them.