Working Toward Whiteness

Author: David R. Roediger
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 9780786722105
Size: 61.60 MB
Format: PDF
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At the vanguard of the study of race and labor in American history, David R. Roediger is the author of the now-classic The Wages of Whiteness, a study of racism in the development of a white working class in nineteenth-century America. In Working Toward Whiteness, he continues that history into the twentieth century. He recounts how American ethnic groups considered white today-including Jewish-, Italian-, and Polish-Americans-once occupied a confused racial status in their new country. They eventually became part of white America thanks to the nascent labor movement, New Deal reforms, and a rise in home-buying. From ethnic slurs to racially restrictive covenants--the racist real estate agreements that ensured all-white neighborhoods--Roediger explores the murky realities of race in twentieth-century America. A masterful history by an award-winning writer, Working Toward Whiteness charts the strange transformation of these new immigrants into the "white ethnics" of America today.

Are Italians White

Author: Jennifer Guglielmo
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136062424
Size: 10.47 MB
Format: PDF
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This dazzling collection of original essays from some of the country's leading thinkers asks the rather intriguing question - Are Italians White? Each piece carefully explores how, when and why whiteness became important to Italian Americans, and the significance of gender, class and nation to racial identity.

The Price Of Whiteness

Author: Eric L. Goldstein
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691121055
Size: 13.49 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Eric Goldstein traces the Jews' encounter with American racial culture from the 1870s through to World War II. At first Jews clung to the notion that they were a distinct 'race'. Latterly Jews became fully vested as part of America's white mainstream and gave up describing themselves in racial terms.

Whiteness Of A Different Color

Author: Matthew Frye Jacobson
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674417801
Size: 59.33 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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America's racial odyssey is the subject of this remarkable work of historical imagination. Matthew Frye Jacobson argues that race resides not in nature but in the contingencies of politics and culture. In ever-changing racial categories we glimpse the competing theories of history and collective destiny by which power has been organized and contested in the United States. Capturing the excitement of the new field of "whiteness studies" and linking it to traditional historical inquiry, Jacobson shows that in this nation of immigrants "race" has been at the core of civic assimilation: ethnic minorities, in becoming American, were re-racialized to become Caucasian.

Blackface White Noise

Author: Michael Rogin
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520213807
Size: 41.61 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The tangled connections that have bound Jews to African Americans in popular culture and liberal politics are at the heart of this text. It explores blackface in Hollywood films as an aperture to various broader issues.

What Went Wrong

Author: Murray Friedman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416576681
Size: 77.54 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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From Selma to Crown Heights--what happened to the Black-Jewish civil rights alliance? Murray Friedman recounts for the first time the whole history of the Black-Jewish relationship in America, from colonial times to the present, and shows that this history is far more complex--and conflicted--than historians and revisionists admit.

Whiteness Visible

Author: Valerie M. Babb
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814713025
Size: 29.73 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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In Whiteness Visible, Valerie Babb investigates the history, values, rituals, and shared consciousness that created whiteness in the United States, as well as the representations that sustain its influence on both cultural and literary vision. Babb formulates an understanding of whiteness by tracing its literary and cultural evolution, enlisting diverse sources from, among others, the Han dynasty, Aristotle's Politica, and excerpts from the recollections of white indentured servants. Babb's textual analysis begins by surveying the construction of whiteness in early American writings and material culture, and continues through literature of the nineteenth century, surveying whiteness in texts commonly acknowledged as standards in U.S. literature--The Last of the Mohicans and Moby Dick. She then investigates representations of whiteness in a variety of late- nineteenth and early-twentieth century cultural creations, among them immigrant autobiographies, World's Fair expositions, and etiquette books. Babb convincingly illustrates the ways in which a variety of cultural creations combine to help shape the concept of universal whiteness. Whiteness Visible boldly claims that we can only understand the full significance of race and the ways in which it influences cultural understanding and cultural creation in the United States when we interrogate whiteness and make it visible.

Race

Author: Steven Gregory
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813521091
Size: 59.39 MB
Format: PDF
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“What unites these essays is a common focus on the 'social construction' of racial categories and a desire to expose the exercise of racism and its intersection with other forms of social domination such as class, gender, and ethnicity . . . Fascinating.”––Multicultural Review “The coming together of theoretical, multiethnic, and 'on-the-ground' perspectives makes this book a particularly valuable contribution to the discourse on race.”––Paula Giddings “Timely and thoughtful. . . contributes to our understanding of how race operates as a social process and in the contextualization of power and status.”––Contemporary Sociology “A treasure chest full of gems. Virtually every article is fascinating and important, and as a collection, its impact is tremendous. Neo-conservative myths and fantasies fall like nine-pins before its well-researched and tightly argued papers.”––Martin Bernal, author of Black Athena “A timely antidote to that reaction tome, The Bell Curve.”––Daily News (New York) “Let's be clear from the start what this book is about,” writes Roger Sanjek. “Race is the framework of ranked categories, segmenting the human population, that was developed by Western Europeans following their global expansion.” To contemporary social scientists, this ranking is baseless, though it has had all-too-real effects. Drawing on anthropology, history, sociology, ethnic studies, and women's studies, this volume explores the role of race in a variety of cultural and historical contexts. The contributors show how racial ideologies intersect with gender, class, nation and sexuality in the formation of complex social identities and hierarchies. The essays address such topics as race and Egyptian nationalism, the construction of “whiteness” in the United States, and the transformation of racial categories in post-colonial Haiti. They demonstrate how social elites and members of subordinated groups construct and rework racial meanings and identities within the context of global political, economic, and cultural change. Race provides a comprehensive and empirically grounded survey of contemporary theoretical approaches to studying the complex interplay of race, power, and identity.