Learning To Teach In Urban Schools

Author: Etta R. Hollins
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113671555X
Size: 47.21 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book is about the transition from teacher preparation to teaching practice in urban school settings. It provides a clear presentation of the challenges, resources, and opportunities for learning to teach in urban schools; examples of the experiences, perceptions, and practices of teachers who are effective in urban schools and those who are not; a detailed account of the journey of a team of teachers who transformed their practice to improve learning in a low performing urban school; an approach that can be used by novice teachers in joining a teacher community and making the transition from preparation to practice; and perspective on leadership that can be used to create a context for transforming teacher professional development in an urban school district. Learning to Teach in Urban Schools offers rare insight into how teachers can transform their own practice and in the process, transform the culture of low performing urban schools.

Toward A Framework Of Resources For Learning To Teach

Author: Lauren Gatti
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137501456
Size: 58.36 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book advances a new framework for learning to teach, using in-depth case studies to show how learning to teach—in any type of program—can best be understood as a recursive and dynamic process, wherein teachers differentially access programmatic, relational, experiential, disciplinary, and dispositional resources. In the last twenty years, debates in the field of teacher preparation have increasingly become paralyzing and divisive as rhetoric around the failure of university teacher preparation intensifies. The author addresses the historical and practical factors that animate these debates, arguing that novice teachers and teacher educators must understand the central conflicts in the field; however, the book also advances a way of approaching learning to teach that accounts for but does not get stuck at the level of programmatic designation. Using lively, in-depth case studies, the author shows how novice urban English teachers from two different teacher preparation pathways—a university-based program and an urban teacher residency—learn to teach within a policy context of high-stakes testing and “college readiness.”

Educating Activist Allies

Author: Katy M. Swalwell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113630584X
Size: 53.40 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2013! Educating Activist Allies offers a fresh take on critical education studies through an analysis of social justice pedagogy in schools serving communities privileged by race and class. By documenting the practices of socially committed teachers at an urban private academy and a suburban public school, Katy Swalwell helps educators and educational theorists better understand the challenges and opportunities inherent in this work. She also examines how students responded to their teachers’ efforts in ways that both undermined and realized the goals of social justice pedagogy. This analysis serves as the foundation for the development of a curricular framework helping students to foster an "Activist Ally" identity: the skills, knowledge, and dispositions necessary to negotiate privilege in ways that promote justice. Educating Activist Allies provides a powerful introduction to the ways in which social justice curricula can and should be enacted in communities of privilege.

Moving Teacher Education Into Urban Schools And Communities

Author: Jana Noel
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136310827
Size: 49.55 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Winner of the 2013 American Educational Studies Association's Critics Choice Award! When teacher education is located on a university campus, set apart from urban schools and communities, it is easy to overlook the realities and challenges communities face as they struggle toward social, economic, cultural, and racial justice. This book describes how teacher education can become a meaningful part of this work, by re-positioning programs directly into urban schools and communities. Situating their work within the theoretical framework of prioritizing community strengths, each set of authors provides a detailed and nuanced description of a teacher education program re-positioned within an urban school or community. Authors describe the process of developing such a relationship, how the university, school, and community became integrated partners in the program, and the impact on participants. As university-based teacher education has come under increased scrutiny for lack of "real world" relevance, this book showcases programs that have successfully navigated the travails of shifting their base directly into urban schools and communities, with evidence of positive outcomes for all involved.

Change D Agents

Author: Betty Achinstein and Rodney T. Ogawa
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807771481
Size: 28.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book examines both the promises and complexities of racially and culturally diversifying todays teaching profession. Drawing from a 5-year study of the lives of 21 new teachers of color working in urban, hard-to-staff schools, this book documents the tensions these teachers experience between serving as role models and fulfilling district and state mandates.

For White Folks Who Teach In The Hood And The Rest Of Y All Too

Author: Christopher Emdin
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807006416
Size: 46.57 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A New York Times Best Seller Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education. Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in classrooms as a young man of color and merging his experiences with more than a decade of teaching and researching in urban America, award-winning educator Christopher Emdin offers a new lens on an approach to teaching and learning in urban schools. For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y’all Too is the much-needed antidote to traditional top-down pedagogy and promises to radically reframe the landscape of urban education for the better. He begins by taking to task the perception of urban youth of color as unteachable, and he challenges educators to embrace and respect each student’s culture and to reimagine the classroom as a site where roles are reversed and students become the experts in their own learning. Putting forth his theory of Reality Pedagogy, Emdin provides practical tools to unleash the brilliance and eagerness of youth and educators alike—both of whom have been typecast and stymied by outdated modes of thinking about urban education. With this fresh and engaging new pedagogical vision, Emdin demonstrates the importance of creating a family structure and building communities within the classroom, using culturally relevant strategies like hip-hop music and call-and-response, and connecting the experiences of urban youth to indigenous populations globally. Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, Emdin demonstrates how by implementing the “Seven C’s” of reality pedagogy in their own classrooms, urban youth of color benefit from truly transformative education. For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y'all Too has been featured in MotherJones.com, Education Week, Weekend All Things Considered with Michel Martin, Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, PBS NewsHour.com, Slate, The Washington Post, Scholastic Administrator Magazine, Essence Magazine, Salon, ColorLines, Ebony.com, Huffington Post Education

Urban Education With An Attitude

Author: Lauri Johnson
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791483589
Size: 41.78 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Teachers, community activists, and parents acknowledge and applaud democratic educational systems that establish partnerships between universities and the urban communities they serve.

Teaching Practices From America S Best Urban Schools

Author: Joseph F. Johnson, Jr.
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317921860
Size: 68.14 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Discover the teaching practices that make the biggest difference in student performance! This practical, research-based book gives principals, teachers, and school administrators a direct, inside look at instructional practices from top award-winning urban schools. The authors provide detailed examples and analyses of these practices, and successfully demystify the achievement of these schools. They offer practical guides to help educators apply these successful practices in their own schools. Teaching Practices from America's Best Urban Schools will be a valuable tool for any educator in both urban and non-urban schools-schools that serve diverse student populations, including English language learners and children from low-income families.

Tep Vol 26 N4

Author: Teacher Education and Practice
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1475819552
Size: 38.32 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Teacher Education and Practice, a peer-refereed journal, is dedicated to the encouragement and the dissemination of research and scholarship related to professional education. The journal is concerned, in the broadest sense, with teacher preparation, practice and policy issues related to the teaching profession, as well as being concerned with learning in the school setting. The journal also serves as a forum for the exchange of diverse ideas and points of view within these purposes. As a forum, the journal offers a public space in which to critically examine current discourse and practice as well as engage in generative dialogue. Alternative forms of inquiry and representation are invited, and authors from a variety of backgrounds and diverse perspectives are encouraged to contribute. Teacher Education & Practice is published by Rowman & Littlefield.

Transformative Pedagogies For Teacher Education

Author: Ann E. Lopez
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1641131098
Size: 39.10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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People are on the move all across the globe and the student population is becoming increasingly more diverse. This has brought about new opportunities and challenges for educators, and teachers. In this series teacher educators a) deconstruct and problematize what it means to educate new teachers for increasingly diverse schools and classroom contexts, and b) highlight experiences of teacher educators as they attempt to bridge the theory to practice divide often encountered in teacher education. In these challenging times when public education is under attack, culturally responsive, antiracist, critical multicultural, social justice and all forms of teaching that are inclusive and equitable must be supported and encouraged. As schools continue to be spaces where ideas and values that promote equity and justice in society are contested, teachers must be proactive in engaging in pedagogies that respond to the needs of a diverse student population. Transformative Pedagogies bring together the work of teachers, scholars, and activists from different countries and contexts who are seeking to transform teacher education. This book will be useful to all educators seeking alternative and innovative approaches to education and meeting the needs of students. Teacher educators examine what it means to be transformative and drawing on experiences from different contexts.