Life In Public Schools Rle Edu L

Author: Geoffrey Walford
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136461949
Size: 53.63 MB
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Britain’s public (that is, its major independent) schools have a conspicuous role in the country’s social system, and as a result are the subject of a long-standing political debate. The discussion is generally founded on a stereotyped image of what these school may have been like in the 1950s – this books shows how they were in the late 1980s. It is based on fieldwork in two major public boarding schools which the author conducted over an extended period, and draws on interviews, observation and documentary sources to establish a picture of what public school life is actually like for pupils and staff. Since the schools were predominantly male preserves, the major part of the book describes the social world and experiences of boys and school-masters. An important section of the book, however, discusses the introduction of girl pupils, the experiences of female teachers and the way schoolmasters’ wives tend to be drawn into their husbands’ work. Geoffrey Walford’s conclusions about life in public schools differ considerably from traditional expectations. At the same time he asks whether there really has been a ‘public school revolution’. His book makes an important contribution to our knowledge of public schools, to debates in the sociology of education and to the issues of abolishing or extending the independent sector.

Keeping Them Out Of The Hands Of Satan

Author: Susan D. Rose
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351855514
Size: 14.84 MB
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First published in 1988, this work was the product of extensive fieldwork in two evangelical communities. This in-depth ethnographic study focuses on the meaning systems, organizational structures and the daily lives of the people Susan D. Rose encountered. The study is centred around Christian schooling as a method of socialisation. Tracing the rise of evangelicalism and the development of the Christian School Movement in the latter half of the twentieth century, it examines the kinds of educational alternatives evangelicals have structured for their children. Moving beyond the issue of schooling itself, it analyses the interactions among schooling, ideology, economic structures and the nature of work in contemporary American society, and explores how people relate to one another within the church-family-school network. It addresses the provocative question of why evangelicalism, a self-proclaimed conservative, reactionary movement, held so much appeal for so many Americans at the time of publication. This work will be of particular interest to those studying education and religion and education in the U. S. A.

Life In Schools

Author: Peter McLaren
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317256646
Size: 27.59 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This new edition brings McLaren's popular, classic textbook into a new era of Common Core Standards and online education. The book is renowned for its clear, provocative classroom narratives and its coverage of political, economic, and social factors that are undervalued in other educational textbooks. An international committee of experts ranked Life in Schools among the top twelve education books in the world.

Meanings And Motivation In Education Research

Author: Margaret M. Baguley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317609743
Size: 56.96 MB
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Meanings and Motivation in Education Research demonstrates the vibrant and vital connection between the researcher and their research. Research is often perceived as an entity which is seemingly produced in isolation; however, there are many important factors which are involved, and this book explores the complexities of investigating the specific areas of meaning and motivation for researchers working in the education sector. With contributions from authors drawn from the field of education in various stages of their career, the perspectives shared in this book are from a diverse range of countries including Australia, Canada, Malaysia, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Key topics include: personal and professional identity narrative inquiry as method teacher educators as researchers conducting education research mixed methods in educational research Foregrounding the personal experiences, interests and motivations of educational researchers Meanings and Motivation in Education Research proves important insights into current discussions in educational research including researchers’ identities, the ways they conduct research and most importantly the impact institutional and personal politics have on their work. This will be a valuable text for educators, education researchers, policy-makers and practitioners across the globe.

Positive Psychology In Higher Education

Author: Acacia C. Parks
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317850645
Size: 21.81 MB
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Positive psychology – the scientific study of happiness – is a rapidly burgeoning field, and in no area more so than education. More departments than ever are offering courses in positive psychology, and demand for these courses is consistently high. Graduate programs offering concentrations in positive psychology have appeared at both masters and doctoral level. Educational institutions have expressed interest in using principles of positive psychology to inform institutional structure, faculty development and pedagogy. Positive psychology has been taught and applied in higher education for almost as long as it has existed as a field, but there is little in the way of published literature that brings all of these developments together. The chapters in this volume represent the use of positive psychology at all levels of higher education – from institutional practices and curricular development to pedagogy and the teaching of positive psychology content itself. This book provides an in-depth look at this exciting area of applied positive psychology which will be relevant to educators and administrators alike. This book is based on a special issue of The Journal of Positive Psychology.

Schooling And The Struggle For Public Life

Author: Henry A. Giroux
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317252489
Size: 48.50 MB
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This book examines the relationship between democracy and schooling and argues that schools are one of the few spheres left where youth can learn the knowledge and skills necessary to become engaged, critical citizens. Not only is the legacy of democracy addressed through the work of John Dewey and others, but the democratic possibilities of schooling are analyzed through a range of issues extending from the politics of teacher authority to the importance of student voices. These issues have only become more vital in an era of neoliberalism and "smaller government," as Giroux discusses at length in this new updated edition.

The Social Novel In England 1830 1850 Rle Dickens

Author: Louis Cazamian
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135027749
Size: 76.83 MB
Format: PDF
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This is the first English translation of Le Roman social en Angleterre by Louis Cazamian, which is widely recognized as the classic survey of Victorian social fiction. Starting from the eighteenth century, Cazamian traces the ways in which rationalism and romanticism intertwined and competed, particularly in relation to radical political philosophy. He shows how industrialization polarized England, setting the industrial bourgeoisie in the van of progress in the first decades of the nineteenth century, until their political and economic triumph stirred up a passionate reaction against them. This reaction propelled novelists such as Charles Dickens who lies at the centre of his discussion. For this translation Martin Fido has provided a substantial foreword, and has revised and completed the bibliographical references and corrected the footnotes to assist the present-day reader.

The New Political Economy Of Urban Education

Author: Pauline Lipman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136759999
Size: 66.85 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Urban education and its contexts have changed in powerful ways. Old paradigms are being eclipsed by global forces of privatization and markets and new articulations of race, class, and urban space. These factors and more set the stage for Pauline Lipman's insightful analysis of the relationship between education policy and the neoliberal economic, political, and ideological processes that are reshaping cities in the United States and around the globe. Using Chicago as a case study of the interconnectedness of neoliberal urban policies on housing, economic development, race, and education, Lipman explores larger implications for equity, justice, and "the right to the city". She draws on scholarship in critical geography, urban sociology and anthropology, education policy, and critical analyses of race. Her synthesis of these lenses gives added weight to her critical appraisal and hope for the future, offering a significant contribution to current arguments about urban schooling and how we think about relations between neoliberal education reforms and the transformation of cities. By examining the cultural politics of why and how these relationships resonate with people's lived experience, Lipman pushes the analysis one step further toward a new educational and social paradigm rooted in radical political and economic democracy.

Education For A New Society

Author: Ernest Green
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415500885
Size: 28.22 MB
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Aimed at the layperson, this book discusses education for the man or woman in the street and the advantages to society of having an educated population, with the aim of not just convincing people of the importance of education but persuading them to take participate actively in education.

Issues In Latino Education

Author: Mariella Espinoza-Herold
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1315392259
Size: 17.68 MB
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Candid and illuminating, this text exposes the educational realities of Latinos (U.S. and foreign-born) in K–12 public schools in the Western United States from the students’ own perspectives. Through the testimonies of students who struggled to graduate from high school, issues that are often oversimplified and commonly misunderstood are brought to life. The students themselves offer pragmatic solutions to reduce the unchanging academic gap among culturally diverse groups. Their accounts are then compared with the viewpoints of a range of K–12 teachers on matters of community, learning, race, culture, and school politics. Examining in depth the question of how to best educate a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population, this critical case study provides food for thought and provokes reflection on the critical role that human interactions and networking play in attaining one’s dreams and human aspirations. Changes in the Second Edition Updated demographics; New chapter: The Role of the Media in the Transmission of Ideologies Related to Latino Students; Updated conclusions and study implications.