The New Encyclopedia Of Southern Culture

Author: Larry J. Griffin
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807882542
Size: 19.93 MB
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This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture offers a timely, authoritative, and interdisciplinary exploration of issues related to social class in the South from the colonial era to the present. With introductory essays by J. Wayne Flynt and by editors Larry J. Griffin and Peggy G. Hargis, the volume is a comprehensive, stand-alone reference to this complex subject, which underpins the history of the region and shapes its future. In 58 thematic essays and 103 topical entries, the contributors explore the effects of class on all aspects of life in the South--its role in Indian removal, the Civil War, the New Deal, and the civil rights movement, for example, and how it has been manifested in religion, sports, country and gospel music, and matters of gender. Artisans and the working class, indentured workers and steelworkers, the Freedmen's Bureau and the Knights of Labor are all examined. This volume provides a full investigation of social class in the region and situates class concerns at the center of our understanding of Southern culture.

King Of The Queen City

Author: Jon Hartley Fox
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252091272
Size: 32.92 MB
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King of the Queen City is the first comprehensive history of King Records, one of the most influential independent record companies in the history of American music. Founded by businessman Sydney Nathan in the mid-1940s, this small outsider record company in Cincinnati, Ohio, attracted a diverse roster of artists, including James Brown, the Stanley Brothers, Grandpa Jones, Redd Foxx, Earl Bostic, Bill Doggett, Ike Turner, Roy Brown, Freddie King, Eddie Vinson, and Johnny "Guitar" Watson. While other record companies concentrated on one style of music, King was active in virtually all genres of vernacular American music, from blues and R & B to rockabilly, bluegrass, western swing, and country. A progressive company in a reactionary time, King was led by an interracial creative and executive staff that redefined the face and voice of American music as well as the way it was recorded and sold. Drawing on personal interviews, research in newspapers and periodicals, and deep access to the King archives, Jon Hartley Fox weaves together the elements of King's success, focusing on the dynamic personalities of the artists, producers, and key executives such as Syd Nathan, Henry Glover, and Ralph Bass. The book also includes a foreword by legendary guitarist, singer, and songwriter Dave Alvin.

Country Music

Author: Richard Carlin
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9780415938020
Size: 34.78 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This illustrated A-Z guide covers more than 700 country music artists, groups, and bands. Articles also cover specific genres within country music as well as instruments used. Written in a lively, engaging style, the entries not only outline the careers of country music's greatest artists, they provide an understanding of the artist's importance or failings, and a feeling for his or her style. Select discographies are provided at the end of each entry, while a bibliography and indexes by instrument, musical style, genre, and song title round out the work. For a full list of entries, a generous selection of sample entries, and more, visit the Country Music: A Biographical Dictionary website.

Smile When You Call Me A Hillbilly

Author: Jeffrey J. Lange
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820326238
Size: 57.73 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Today, country music enjoys a national fan base that transcends both economic and social boundaries. Sixty years ago, however, it was primarily the music of rural, working-class whites living in the South and was perceived by many Americans as “hillbilly music.” In Smile When You Call Me a Hillbilly, Jeffrey J. Lange examines the 1940s and early 1950s as the most crucial period in country music’s transformation from a rural, southern folk art form to a national phenomenon. In his meticulous analysis of changing performance styles and alterations in the lifestyles of listeners, Lange illuminates the acculturation of country music and its audience into the American mainstream. Dividing country music into six subgenres (progressive country, western swing, postwar traditional, honky-tonk, country pop, and country blues), Lange discusses the music’s expanding appeal. As he analyzes the recordings and comments of each of the subgenre’s most significant artists, including Roy Acuff, Bob Wills, Bill Monroe, Hank Williams, and Red Foley, he traces the many paths the musical form took on its road to respectability. Lange shows how along the way the music and its audience became more sophisticated, how the subgenres blended with one another and with American popular music, and how Nashville emerged as the country music hub. By 1954, the transformation from “hillbilly” music to country music was complete, precipitated by the modernizing forces of World War II and realized by the efforts of promoters, producers, and performers.

Dolly Parton Gender And Country Music

Author: LEIGH H. EDWARDS
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253031567
Size: 80.64 MB
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Dolly Parton is instantly recognizable for her iconic style and persona, but how did she create her enduring image? Dolly crafted her exaggerated appearance and stage personality by combining two opposing stereotypes—the innocent mountain girl and the voluptuous sex symbol. Emerging through her lyrics, personal stories, stage presence, and visual imagery, these wildly different gender tropes form a central part of Dolly’s media image and portrayal of herself as a star and celebrity. By developing a multilayered image and persona, Dolly both critiques representations of femininity in country music and attracts a diverse fan base ranging from country and pop music fans to feminists and gay rights advocates. In Dolly Parton, Gender, and Country Music, Leigh H. Edwards explores Dolly’s roles as musician, actor, author, philanthropist, and entrepreneur to show how Dolly’s gender subversion highlights the challenges that can be found even in the most seemingly traditional form of American popular music. As Dolly depicts herself as simultaneously "real" and "fake," she offers new perspectives on country music’s claims of authenticity.

Television And Radio Announcing

Author: Stuart Hyde
Publisher: Pearson College Division
ISBN: 9780205563043
Size: 44.75 MB
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Television and Radio Announcing, 11eStuart Hyde, "San Francisco"" State University" "Television and Radio Announcing" takes a practical, career-oriented approach to the study of broadcast performance by successfully blending the coverage of theory with the practice of announcing. Now in its eleventh edition, this classic text offers the broadest coverage of announcing available today. Hailed for its compelling, conversational writing style, Hyde's work offers timeless and relevant information to new broadcasting students while emphasizing the most successful techniques in the field. The new edition has been revised to reflect the recent technology and market changes affecting announcers today and retains the same overriding goal of previous editions: to help students become more effective and responsible communicators. New and classic features to this text include: - "Checklist" boxes throughout the text give step-by-step instructions to students who are just learning the basics of announcing. - Scripts throughout each chapter offer students the opportunity to immediately practice the concepts they are learning about within the text. - "Spotlight" boxes are written by professionals in the announcing field and give tips on how to improve voice personality, how to sound like a local, and more. - New "Student Voices" boxes are essays written by real students who offer a personal slant on several key topics including: Podcasting, Internet radio, YouTube and MTV VJs. Praise for "Television and Radio Announcing," 11e: "This text is strong in a number of ways. I think its greatest strength lies in the practical tips for improving performance skills and strategizing career opportunities. The text clearly suggests the author's long history in the field, without being rarified and academic." -- Ceilidh Charleson-Jennings, "Collin"" County Community College".""

A Boy Named Sue

Author: Kristine M. McCusker
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9781604739565
Size: 14.50 MB
Format: PDF
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An anthology that questions the roles gender plays in creating and marketing a great American musical form

The Book Of Matt

Author: Stephen Jimenez
Publisher: Steerforth
ISBN: 1586422154
Size: 61.55 MB
Format: PDF
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What role did crystal meth and other previously underreported factors play in the brutal murder of gay college student Matthew Shepard? The Book of Matt is a page-turning cautionary tale that humanizes and de-mythologizes Matthew while following the evidence where it leads, without regard to the politics that have long attended this American tragedy. Late on the night of October 6, 1998, twenty-one-year-old Matthew Shepard left a bar in Laramie, Wyoming with two alleged “strangers,” Aaron McKin­ney and Russell Henderson. Eighteen hours later, Matthew was found tied to a log fence on the outskirts of town, unconscious and barely alive. He had been pistol-whipped so severely that the mountain biker who discovered his battered frame mistook him for a Halloween scarecrow. Overnight, a politically expedient myth took the place of important facts. By the time Matthew died a few days later, his name was synonymous with anti-gay hate. Stephen Jimenez went to Laramie to research the story of Matthew Shepard’s murder in 2000, after the two men convicted of killing him had gone to prison, and after the national media had moved on. His aim was to write a screenplay on what he, and the rest of the nation, believed to be an open-and-shut case of bigoted violence. As a gay man, he felt an added moral imperative to tell Matthew’s story. But what Jimenez eventually found in Wyoming was a tangled web of secrets. His exhaustive investigation also plunged him deep into the deadly underworld of drug trafficking. Over the course of a thirteen-year investigation, Jimenez traveled to twenty states and Washington DC, and interviewed more than a hundred named sources. The Book of Matt is sure to stir passions and inspire dialogue as it re-frames this misconstrued crime and its cast of characters, proving irrefutably that Matthew Shepard was not killed for being gay but for reasons far more complicated — and daunting. From the Hardcover edition.