Making Indian Law

Author: Christian W. McMillen
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300143294
Size: 66.85 MB
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In 1941, after decades of struggling to hold on to the remainder of their aboriginal home, the Hualapai Indians finally took their case to the Supreme Court?and won. The Hualapai case was the culminating event in a legal and intellectual revolution that transformed Indian law and ushered in a new way of writing Indian history that provided legal grounds for native land claims. But Making Indian Law is about more than a legal decision. It's the story of Hualapai activists, and eventually sympathetic lawyers, who challenged both the Santa Fe Railroad and the U.S. government to a courtroom showdown over the meaning of Indian property rights?and the Indian past. At the heart of the Hualapai campaign to save the reservation was documenting the history of Hualapai land use. Making Indian Law showcases the central role that the Hualapai and their lawyers played in formulating new understandings of native people, their property, and their past. To this day, the impact of the Hualapai decision is felt wherever and whenever indigenous land claims are litigated throughout the world.

Dispossessing The Wilderness

Author: Mark David Spence
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195142433
Size: 49.97 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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National parks like Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Glacier preserve some of this country's most cherished wilderness landscapes. While visions of pristine, uninhabited nature led to the creation of these parks, they also inspired policies of Indian removal. By contrasting the native histories of these places with the links between Indian policy developments and preservationist efforts, this work examines the complex origins of the national parks and the troubling consequences of the American wilderness ideal. The first study to place national park history within the context of the early reservation era, it details the ways that national parks developed into one of the most important arenas of contention between native peoples and non-Indians in the twentieth century.

The Wind Won T Know Me

Author: Emily Benedek
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780806131252
Size: 72.53 MB
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An account of the battle between the Navahos and Hopis over millions of acres of disputed Arizona land discusses the various competing interests involved

Immigrate To Canada

Author: Nick Noorani
Publisher: Self-Counsel Press
ISBN: 1770409580
Size: 19.81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Canada is one of the world's most welcoming countries, a relatively new land built by immigration with some of the top cities in which to live. But how do you turn your dreams abroad into reality in Canada? This book, part of the Canadian Newcomers series, gives you the critical advantage in understanding how to prepare to come to Canada. It shows you how to navigate the government maze and how to ensure your paperwork is in order. And it provides insights from its experienced authors on what to expect on your journey.

Encyclopedia Of Immigration And Migration In The American West

Author: Gordon Morris Bakken
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1412905508
Size: 70.77 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Encyclopedia of Immigration and Migration in the American West provides much more than ethnic groups crossing the plains, landing at ports, or crossing borders; this two-volume work makes the history of the American West an important part of the American experience. Through sweeping entries, focused biographies, community histories, economic enterprise analysis, and demographic studies, this Encyclopedia presents the tapestry of the West and its population during various periods of migration. The two volumes examine the settling of the West and include coverage of movements of American Indians, African Americans, and the often-forgotten role of women in the West's development.

I Am The Grand Canyon

Author: Stephen Hirst
Publisher: Grand Canyon Association
ISBN: 9780938216865
Size: 50.43 MB
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I Am the Grand Canyon is the story of the Havasupai people. From their origins among the first group of Indians to arrive in North America some 20,000 years ago to their epic struggle to regain traditional lands taken from them in the nineteenth century, the Havasupai have a long and colorful history. The story of this tiny tribe once confined to a toosmall reservation depicts a people with deep cultural ties to the land, both on their former reservation below the rim of the Grand Canyon and on the surrounding plateaus. In the spring of 1971, the federal government proposed incorporating still more Havasupai land into Grand Canyon National Park. At hearings that spring, Havasupai Tribal Chairman Lee Marshall rose to speak. “I heard all you people talking about the Grand Canyon,” he said. “Well, you’re looking at it. I am the Grand Canyon!” Marshall made it clear that Havasu Canyon and the surrounding plateau were critical to the survival of his peop≤ his speech laid the foundation for the return of thousands of acres of Havasupai land in 1975. I Am the Grand Canyon is the story of a heroic people who refused to back down when facing overwhelming odds. They won, and today the Havasupai way of life quietly continues in the Grand Canyon and on the surrounding plateaus.

Tribal Names Of The Americas

Author: Patricia Roberts Clark
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786451696
Size: 39.91 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Scholars have long worked to identify the names of tribes and other groupings in the Americas, a task made difficult by the sheer number of indigenous groups and the many names that have been passed down only through oral tradition. This book is a compendium of tribal names in all their variants—from North, Central and South America—collected from printed sources. Because most of these original sources reproduced words that had been encountered only orally, there is a great deal of variation. Organized alphabetically, this book collates these variations, traces them to the spellings and forms that have become standardized, and supplies see and see also references. Each main entry includes tribal name, the “parent group” or ancestral tribe, original source for the tribal name, and approximate location of the name in the original source material.

Culture Builds Communities

Author: Kathy Booth
Publisher: Partners for Livable Places
ISBN:
Size: 58.59 MB
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This guide arose from a forum held in 1994 at the Smithsonian Institution. It is a resource for civic leaders and cultural institutions to utilize in their ever more common partnerships. Synopses of successful programs nationwide are provided, thereby laying the groundwork for your group, institution, city, or school to implement community-based partnerships. Contains an extensive resource list.