Maps Of Meaning

Author: Jordan B. Peterson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135961743
Size: 19.91 MB
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Why have people from different cultures and eras formulated myths and stories with similar structures? What does this similarity tell us about the mind, morality, and structure of the world itself? From the author of 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos comes a provocative hypothesis that explores the connection between what modern neuropsychology tells us about the brain and what rituals, myths, and religious stories have long narrated. A cutting-edge work that brings together neuropsychology, cognitive science, and Freudian and Jungian approaches to mythology and narrative, Maps of Meaning presents a rich theory that makes the wisdom and meaning of myth accessible to the critical modern mind.

Maps Of Meaning

Author: Peter Jackson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113487538X
Size: 49.66 MB
Format: PDF
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This innovative book marks a significant departure from tradition anlayses of the evolution of cultural landscapes and the interpretation of past environments. Maps of Meaning proposes a new agenda for cultural geography, one set squarely in the context of contemporary social and cultural theory. Notions of place and space are explored through the study of elite and popular cultures, gender and sexuality, race, language and ideology. Questioning the ways in which we invest the world with meaning, the book is an introduction to both culture's geographies and the geography of culture.

The Map Of Meaning

Author: Marjolein Lips-Wiersma
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351278029
Size: 67.14 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book introduces a "Map of Meaning" called the Holistic Development Model, which provides a clear, simple and profound framework of the dimensions and process of living and working meaningfully.Like all reliable maps this one has been carefully tested. It is based on over 15 years' research into the insights and practice of ordinary people. Although the authors borrow from the work of philosophers, psychologists and sociologists to provide evidence and context for their ideas, the main contribution of this book is that it describes how ordinary human beings wrestle with, and give answers to, the questions of "What is meaningful work and a meaningful life?" This innate human knowledge is captured in a practical model that makes understanding and working with issues of meaning clear and accessible to everyone.At an individual level this book helps people to define and stay in contact with what is most important to them as they grapple with the real problems of daily life and suggests how they can stay in charge of keeping the human search for meaning alive, especially in the face of the challenges that exist in organizational life. The authors recognize that in the current economic context a simple map of meaning is essential, precisely because organizational life has become so intensely directed towards a singular economic goal. They argue that it is vital that people have a simple and powerful way to reclaim the significance of meaning in their working lives.There are numerous studies that show conclusively that meaningful work, or its absence, influences some important outcomes in organizational life such as motivation, absenteeism, work behaviour, engagement, job satisfaction, empowerment, stress and performance. But people's humanity and search for meaning, so often compromised at work, is not something that can be mechanised by the latest self-help or managerial technique. It is not something that can be picked up and dropped as convenient. The authors argue that being human is not a fad. Being human is enduring and needs to be taken seriously. Creating meaningful work, therefore, leads to many desired organizational outcomes, but implementing it does require the courage to question some fundamental ways of thinking about business and the integrity to engage with the issues sincerely. At an organizational level this book offers many practical examples of how to build and maintain workplaces that are meaningful to people.The idea that there is a parallel between the meanings, decision-making dynamics and actions of individuals and organizations is central to the structure of this book. It therefore addresses meaning at both individual and organizational level and in the dynamic between them. This is neither a self-help book, nor an organizational systems book; its strength is that it draws together the aspirations of individuals with those of the organizations in which they work.At the same time, this is not a naïve book. One of the strengths of the Holistic Development Model is that it takes tensions, paradoxes and imperfections as a given. They are part of being human and they are part of organizations. The book is not only about the importance of living meaningfully, it is about how to do it. The book is full of stories of people who have worked with the model. They demonstrate the versatility of the model and how it helps them to analyse, speak to, plan around and respond to an enormous variety of everyday issues and situations. It is this resourcefulness the authors would like readers to get from this book and have at their fingertips.This book is primarily written for anyone, from a CEO to a blue-collar worker or consultant, who is interested in creating more meaning and purpose in work and organizations, and who would like to better understand how to get others on board. It is for those searching for ways to re-energize their roles or change their careers. It is for anyone who firmly believes that it must be possible to align our deeper life purposes with our daily actions in the workplace.

12 Rules For Life

Author: Jordan B. Peterson
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 0345816021
Size: 13.31 MB
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"What does everyone in the modern world need to know? [The author's] answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. [The author discusses] discussing discipline, freedom, adventure and responsibility, distilling the world's wisdom into 12 practical and profound rules for life"--Amazon.com.

Maps And Meaning

Author: Nancy H. Wiener
Publisher: Augsburg Fortress Publishers
ISBN: 1451482949
Size: 31.19 MB
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Maps and Meaning is rooted in the authors’ experience as clergy and chaplains and is relevant to those looking for a fresh perspective on biblical narratives related to the role of the priest, patients, soldiers, and others who spend time “outside the camp.” Drawing on diverse fields, from neuroscience to anthropology, the authors consider the geographical, interpersonal, temporal, and spiritual transitions individuals experience when they move “in” and “out of the camp” and the impact their time outside the camp has on family and community. They offer a unique perspective on self-care for caregivers of different disciplines who negotiate these transitions in their work. And they explore the lives and transitions of patients and returning veterans. Drawing on contemporary explorations of stigma, the authors raise communal questions related to healthcare, returning veterans, and incarcerated people. They propose a societal approach that embraces the inevitability of life’s ebbs and flow and that draws maps to facilitate these journeys.

Exploring Positive Psychology The Science Of Happiness And Well Being

Author: Erik M. Gregory
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610699408
Size: 46.97 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Looking for an introduction to positive psychology that offers real-life examples? This overview of the science of happiness supplies case studies from some of the world's most successful organizations and describes ways to experience the personal impact of this exciting scientific field. Grounded in academics but accessible to a wide range of readers Challenges the reader to engage in the material and examine the application of positive psychology across multiple domains Provides an extensive bibliography with references to books, journal articles, popular press articles, and websites Includes examples of how media and technology can promote happiness and well-being Provides practical and applied knowledge in the field that can be used in one's daily life

The Psychology Of Religion Fourth Edition

Author: Ralph W. Hood, Jr.
Publisher: Guilford Press
ISBN: 1606233920
Size: 32.52 MB
Format: PDF
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Scholarly and comprehensive yet accessible, this state-of-the-science work is widely regarded as the definitive graduate-level psychology of religion text. The authors synthesize classic and contemporary empirical research on numerous different religious groups. Coverage includes religious thought, belief, and behavior across the lifespan; links between religion and biology; the forms and meaning of religious experience; the social psychology of religious organizations; and connections to morality, coping, mental health, and psychopathology. Every chapter features thought-provoking quotations and examples that bring key concepts to life. New to This Edition *Revised and updated with the latest theories, methods, and empirical findings.*Many new research examples.*Restructured with fewer chapters for better “fit” with a typical semester.*More attention to the differences between religion and spirituality*Covers emerging topics: genetics and neurobiology, positive psychology, atheism, and more.

The Great Leveler

Author: Walter Scheidel
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400884608
Size: 69.53 MB
Format: PDF
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Are mass violence and catastrophes the only forces that can seriously decrease economic inequality? To judge by thousands of years of history, the answer is yes. Tracing the global history of inequality from the Stone Age to today, Walter Scheidel shows that inequality never dies peacefully. Inequality declines when carnage and disaster strike and increases when peace and stability return. The Great Leveler is the first book to chart the crucial role of violent shocks in reducing inequality over the full sweep of human history around the world. Ever since humans began to farm, herd livestock, and pass on their assets to future generations, economic inequality has been a defining feature of civilization. Over thousands of years, only violent events have significantly lessened inequality. The "Four Horsemen" of leveling—mass-mobilization warfare, transformative revolutions, state collapse, and catastrophic plagues—have repeatedly destroyed the fortunes of the rich. Scheidel identifies and examines these processes, from the crises of the earliest civilizations to the cataclysmic world wars and communist revolutions of the twentieth century. Today, the violence that reduced inequality in the past seems to have diminished, and that is a good thing. But it casts serious doubt on the prospects for a more equal future. An essential contribution to the debate about inequality, The Great Leveler provides important new insights about why inequality is so persistent—and why it is unlikely to decline anytime soon.

Beyond Empiricism

Author: Joan McCord
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351322540
Size: 50.53 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Beyond Empiricism expands the discourse on theories of criminal behavior. It considers institutional, social, and individual issues related to criminal behavior, while individually each raises questions about the adequacy of current theoretical claims. The topics have significant implications both for policy and research in criminology. Per-Olof Wikstrom introduces a cross-level action theory of crime. He suggests that better understanding of causal mechanisms can lead to a situational theory of action based on perception of alternatives and the process of choice. David Wolcott and Steven Schlossman provide new perspectives on the issues of racial disparity and the incarceration of adolescents in adult prisons. These authors highlight gaps in our understanding of early twentieth-century juvenile justice and negate some popular claims about recent changes in the criminal law. Peter Grabosky spotlights privatization policies in the criminal justice system, suggesting a framework for analyzing the balance of advantage resulting from three basic forms of institutional relationships in policing. Steven Messner and Richard Rosenfeld discuss why institutional analysis has been seriously underdeveloped in etiological analyses of crime. Jordan Pederson and Matthew Shane scrutinize the concept of aggression. Their descriptions of aggressive behavior among non-human animals provide a fascinating backdrop for understanding human actions. Joan McCord emphasizes the intentionality of crimes as she argues that to understand what causes crime, one must have a theory about what it means to act intentionally. After critically appraising prior theories, McCord introduces and defends a new theory of motivation based on a post-empiricist theory of language. This latest volume in the distinguished Advances in Criminological Theory series continues to add to the theoretical underpinnings of the field, and will be important to all collections of social science research on criminology.

The Brain And The Meaning Of Life

Author: Paul Thagard
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691154406
Size: 16.18 MB
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Why is life worth living? What makes actions right or wrong? What is reality and how do we know it? The Brain and the Meaning of Life draws on research in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience to answer some of the most pressing questions about life's nature and value. Paul Thagard argues that evidence requires the abandonment of many traditional ideas about the soul, free will, and immortality, and shows how brain science matters for fundamental issues about reality, morality, and the meaning of life. The ongoing Brain Revolution reveals how love, work, and play provide good reasons for living. Defending the superiority of evidence-based reasoning over religious faith and philosophical thought experiments, Thagard argues that minds are brains and that reality is what science can discover. Brains come to know reality through a combination of perception and reasoning. Just as important, our brains evaluate aspects of reality through emotions that can produce both good and bad decisions. Our cognitive and emotional abilities allow us to understand reality, decide effectively, act morally, and pursue the vital needs of love, work, and play. Wisdom consists of knowing what matters, why it matters, and how to achieve it. The Brain and the Meaning of Life shows how brain science helps to answer questions about the nature of mind and reality, while alleviating anxiety about the difficulty of life in a vast universe. The book integrates decades of multidisciplinary research, but its clear explanations and humor make it accessible to the general reader.