No No Boy

Author: John Okada
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295806001
Size: 52.75 MB
Format: PDF
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"No-No Boy has the honor of being the very first Japanese American novel,� writes novelist Ruth Ozeki in her new foreword to John Okada�s classic of Asian American literature. First published in 1956, No-No Boy was virtually ignored by a public eager to put World War II and the Japanese internment behind them. It was not until the mid-1970s that a new generation of Japanese American writers and scholars recognized the novel�s importance and popularized it as one of literature�s most powerful testaments to the Asian American experience. No-No Boy tells the story of Ichiro Yamada, a fictional version of the real-life �no-no boys.� Yamada answered �no� twice in a compulsory government questionnaire as to whether he would serve in the armed forces and swear loyalty to the United States. Unwilling to pledge himself to the country that interned him and his family, Ichiro earns two years in prison and the hostility of his family and community when he returns home to Seattle. As Ozeki writes, Ichiro�s �obsessive, tormented� voice subverts Japanese postwar �model-minority� stereotypes, showing a fractured community and one man�s �threnody of guilt, rage, and blame as he tries to negotiate his reentry into a shattered world.� The first edition of No-No Boy since 1979 presents this important work to new generations of readers. Replaces ISBN 9780295955254

Citizen 13660

Author:
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295959894
Size: 22.21 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Drawings with brief comments by the author describe her memories of life in a California internment camp during World War II

Nisei Daughter

Author: Monica Itoi Sone
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295956886
Size: 33.20 MB
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Tells the story of a Japanese-American woman growing up in Seattle in the 1930s who was subjected to relocation during World War II

America Is In The Heart

Author: Carlos Bulosan
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295801077
Size: 42.89 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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First published in 1946, this autobiography of the well-known Filipino poet describes his boyhood in the Philippines, his voyage to America, and his years of hardship and despair as an itinerant laborer following the harvest trail in the rural West.

Mrs Spring Fragrance

Author: Sui Sin Far
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486782735
Size: 45.84 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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One of the first works of fiction published by a Chinese-American author, this collection of 17 short stories offers a revealing look at life in San Francisco's Chinatown during the early 20th century.

Emergent U S Literatures

Author: Cyrus Patell
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479804495
Size: 57.88 MB
Format: PDF
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Emergent U.S. Literatures introduces readers to the foundational writers and texts produced by four literary traditions associated with late-twentieth-century US multiculturalism. Examining writing by Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, and gay and lesbian Americans after 1968, Cyrus R. K. Patell compares and historicizes what might be characterized as the minority literatures within “U.S. minority literature.” Drawing on recent theories of cosmopolitanism, Patell presents methods for mapping the overlapping concerns of the texts and authors of these literatures during the late twentieth century. He discusses the ways in which literary marginalization and cultural hybridity combine to create the grounds for literature that is truly “emergent” in Raymond Williams’s sense of the term—literature that produces “new meanings and values, new practices, new relationships and kinds of relationships” in tension with the dominant, mainstream culture of the United States. By enabling us to see the American literary canon through the prism of hybrid identities and cultures, these texts require us to reevaluate what it means to write (and read) in the American grain. Emergent U.S. Literatures gives readers a sense of how these foundational texts work as aesthetic objects—rather than merely as sociological documents—crafted in dialogue with the canonical tradition of so-called “American Literature,” as it existed in the late twentieth century, as well as in dialogue with each other.

China Men

Author: Maxine Hong Kingston
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307787818
Size: 68.79 MB
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The author chronicles the lives of three generations of Chinese men in America, woven from memory, myth and fact. Here's a storyteller's tale of what they endured in a strange new land. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Bone

Author: Fae Myenne Ng
Publisher: Hachette Books
ISBN: 0316312185
Size: 73.63 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"We were a family of three girls. By Chinese standards, that wasn't lucky. In Chinatown, everyone knew our story. Outsiders jerked their chins, looked at us, shook their heads. We heard things." In this profoundly moving novel, Fae Myenne Ng takes readers into the hidden heart of San Francisco's Chinatown, to the world of one family's honor, their secrets, and the lost bones of a "paper father." Two generations of the Leong family live in an uneasy tension as they try to fathom the source of a brave young girl's sorrow. Oldest daughter Leila tells the story: of her sister Ona, who has ended her young, conflicted life by jumping from the roof of a Chinatown housing project; of her mother Mah, a seamstress in a garment shop run by a "Chinese Elvis"; of Leon, her father, a merchant seaman who ships out frequently; and the family's youngest, Nina, who has escaped to New York by working as a flight attendant. With Ona and Nina gone, it is up to Leila to lay the bones of the family's collective guilt to rest, and find some way to hope again. Fae Myenne Ng's luminous debut explores what it means to be a stranger in one's own family, a foreigner in one's own neighborhood--and whether it's possible to love a place that may never feel quite like home.

We Should Never Meet

Author: Aimee Phan
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1429941987
Size: 62.96 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Compelling, moving, and beautifully written, the interlinked stories that make up We Should Never Meet alternate between Saigon before the city's fall in 1975 and present-day "Little Saigon" in Southern California---exploring the reverberations of the Vietnam War in a completely new light. Intersecting the lives of eight characters across three decades and two continents, these stories dramatize the events of Operation Babylift, the U.S.-led evacuation of thousands of Vietnamese orphans to America just weeks before the fall of Saigon. Unwitting reminders of the war, these children were considered bui doi, the dust of life, and faced an uncertain, dangerous existence if left behind in Vietnam. Four of the stories follow the saga of one orphan's journey from the points-of-view of a teenage mother, a duck farmer and a Catholic nun from the Mekong Delta, a social worker in Saigon, and a volunteer doctor from America. The other four take place twenty years later and chronicle the lives of four Vietnamese orphans now living in America: Kim, an embittered Amerasian searching for her unknown mother; Vinh, her gang member ex-boyfriend who preys on Vietnamese families; Mai, an ambitious orphan who faces her emancipation from the American foster-care system; and Huan, an Amerasian adopted by a white family, who returns to Vietnam with his adoptive mother. We Should Never Meet is one of those rare books that truly takes an original look at the human condition---and marks the exciting debut of a major new writer for our time.

Margins And Mainstreams

Author: Gary Y. Okihiro
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295805366
Size: 39.88 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In this classic book on the meaning of multiculturalism in larger American society, Gary Okihiro explores the significance of Asian American experiences from the perspectives of historical consciousness, race, gender, class, and culture. While exploring anew the meanings of Asian American social history, Okihiro argues that the core values and ideals of the nation emanate today not from the so-called mainstream but from the margins, from among Asian and African Americans, Latinos and American Indians, women, and the gay and lesbian community. Those groups in their struggles for equality, have helped to preserve and advance the founders� ideals and have made America a more democratic place for all.