Parents And Schools

Author: William W. Cutler
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022630793X
Size: 47.53 MB
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Who holds ultimate authority for the education of America's children—teachers or parents? Although the relationship between home and school has changed dramatically over the decades, William Cutler's fascinating history argues that it has always been a political one, and his book uncovers for the first time how and why the balance of power has shifted over time. Starting with parental dominance in the mid-nineteenth century, Cutler chronicles how schools' growing bureaucratization and professionalization allowed educators to gain increasing control over the schooling and lives of the children they taught. Central to his story is the role of parent-teacher associations, which helped transform an adversarial relationship into a collaborative one. Yet parents have also been controlled by educators through PTAs, leading to the perception that they are "company unions." Cutler shows how in the 1920s and 1930s schools expanded their responsibility for children's well-being outside the classroom. These efforts sowed the seeds for later conflict as schools came to be held accountable for solving society's problems. Finally, he brings the reader into recent decades, in which a breakdown of trust, racial tension, and "parents' rights" have taken the story full circle, with parents and schools once again at odds. Cutler's book is an invaluable guide to understanding how parent-teacher cooperation, which is essential for our children's educational success, might be achieved.

Issues In K 12 Education

Author: CQ Researcher,
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1483343596
Size: 63.82 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Are Students Being Prepared for the Technological Age? Can AP and IB Programs Raise U.S. High-School Achievement? Do Teachers Assign Too Much Homework? These are just a few of the provocative questions posed in Issues in K-12 Education. This engaging reader allows students to see an issue from all sides and to think critically about topics that matter to them. Classroom discussion will never be dull again! About CQ Researcher Readers In the tradition of nonpartisanship and current analysis that is the hallmark of CQ Press, CQ Researcher readers investigate important and controversial policy issues. Offer your students the balanced reporting, complete overviews, and engaging writing that CQ Researcher has consistently provided for more than 80 years. Each article gives substantial background and analysis of a particular issue as well as useful pedagogical features to inspire critical thinking and to help students grasp and review key material: A pro/con box that examines two competing sides of a single question A detailed chronology of key dates and events An annotated bibliography that includes Web resources An outlook section that addresses possible regulation and initiatives from Capitol Hill and the White House over the next 5 to 10 years Photos, charts, graphs, and maps

Leaders In The Historical Study Of American Education

Author: Wayne J. Urban
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9460917550
Size: 20.88 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This volume consists of twenty six autobiographical essays by leading historians of American education which document the enormous variety of paths taken to get into this field. A companion to earlier volumes on philosophy of education and curriculum studies, the historians in this volume reflect a wide variety of interests that underlay accomplishment in this scholarly field. They come from diverse backgrounds that have animated their scholarly careers in compelling ways. Readers in any variety of educational or historical study should learn from this volume how unplanned careers can still result in highly successful sets of accomplishments. That realization is a tribute both to the individual contributors and to the great attractiveness of educational history to committed scholars of various backgrounds and orientations.

The Oxford Handbook Of Church And State In The United States

Author: Derek H. Davis
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190208783
Size: 32.47 MB
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Study of church and state in the United States is incredibly complex. Scholars working in this area have backgrounds in law, religious studies, history, theology, and politics, among other fields. Historically, they have focused on particular angles or dimensions of the church-state relationship, because the field is so vast. The results have mostly been monographs that focus only on narrow cross-sections of the field, and the few works that do aim to give larger perspectives are reference works of factual compendia, which offer little or no analysis. The Oxford Handbook of Church and State in the United States fills this gap, presenting an extensive, multidimensional overview of the field. Twenty-one essays offer a scholarly look at the intricacies and past and current debates that frame the American system of church and state, within five main areas: history, law, theology/philosophy, politics, and sociology. These essays provide factual accounts, but also address issues, problems, debates, controversies, and, where appropriate, suggest resolutions. They also offer analysis of the range of interpretations of the subject offered by various American scholars. This Handbook is an invaluable resource for the study of church-state relations in the United States.

Ask The Teacher

Author: Mark Ryan
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
ISBN: 9780205522194
Size: 28.20 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Using a straightforward and versatile question and answer approach, the Second Edition of Ask the Teacher speaks directly to the teacher candidate with a wealth of tips about educational issues in foundations, history, psychology, curriculum, methodology, classroom management, and family involvement. Designed to guide the student throughout the curricula of a professional education program, this text poses universal questions and provides responses that are grounded in educational theory and practice as well as the expertise of the author, Mark Ryan. Because its purpose is to stimulate reflective thought, Ask the Teacher is not for the passive reader but for one who desires a contextual intellectual discourse--a dialogue that promotes a genuinely reflective understanding of the diverse classroom in the 21st Century. This useful, comprehensive handbook on teaching can be used as a core text or supplement in introductory education courses. Its targeted and useful information will also continue to be of use to the beginning teacher in their formative years of teaching.

Southern Stalemate

Author: Christopher Bonastia
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226063917
Size: 17.86 MB
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In 1959, Virginia’s Prince Edward County closed its public schools rather than obey a court order to desegregate. For five years, black children were left to fend for themselves while the courts decided if the county could continue to deny its citizens public education. Investigating this remarkable and nearly forgotten story of local, state, and federal political confrontation, Christopher Bonastia recounts the test of wills that pitted resolute African Americans against equally steadfast white segregationists in a battle over the future of public education in America. Beginning in 1951 when black high school students protested unequal facilities and continuing through the return of whites to public schools in the 1970s and 1980s, Bonastia describes the struggle over education during the civil rights era and the human suffering that came with it, as well as the inspiring determination of black residents to see justice served. Artfully exploring the lessons of the Prince Edward saga, Southern Stalemate unearths new insights about the evolution of modern conservatism and the politics of race in America.

The Color Of Mind

Author: Derrick Darby
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022652549X
Size: 75.89 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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American students vary in educational achievement, but white students in general typically have better test scores and grades than black students. Why is this the case, and what can school leaders do about it? In The Color of Mind, Derrick Darby and John L. Rury answer these pressing questions and show that we cannot make further progress in closing the achievement gap until we understand its racist origins. Telling the story of what they call the Color of Mind—the idea that there are racial differences in intelligence, character, and behavior—they show how philosophers, such as David Hume and Immanuel Kant, and American statesman Thomas Jefferson, contributed to the construction of this pernicious idea, how it influenced the nature of schooling and student achievement, and how voices of dissent such as Frederick Douglass, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, and W. E. B. Du Bois debunked the Color of Mind and worked to undo its adverse impacts. Rejecting the view that racial differences in educational achievement are a product of innate or cultural differences, Darby and Rury uncover the historical interplay between ideas about race and American schooling, to show clearly that the racial achievement gap has been socially and institutionally constructed. School leaders striving to bring justice and dignity to American schools today must work to root out the systemic manifestations of these ideas within schools, while still doing what they can to mitigate the negative effects of poverty, segregation, inequality, and other external factors that adversely affect student achievement. While we cannot expect schools alone to solve these vexing social problems, we must demand that they address the dignitary injustices associated with how we track, discipline, and deal with special education that reinforce long-standing racist ideas. That is the only way to expel the Color of Mind from schools, close the racial achievement gap, and afford all children the dignity they deserve.

Five Generations Of A Mexican American Family In Los Angeles

Author: Christina Chávez
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc
ISBN:
Size: 18.70 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Five Generations of a Mexican American Family in Los Angeles is an insider account of a multigenerational working-class Mexican American family in Los Angeles to explain Chicanos' persistent social status despite their citizenship and largely English monolingualism. Findings demonstrate that the interaction between race, ethnicity and class factors at home, in the labor market and in schools reproduces the Fuentes family's social status. Nevertheless, the persistence of Mexican cultural values over generations insulates Fuentes members against discrimination and economic hardship.