Plants Have So Much To Give Us All We Have To Do Is Ask

Author: Mary Siisip Geniusz
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780816696765
Size: 27.22 MB
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Mary Siisip Geniusz has spent more than thirty years working with, living with, and using the Anishinaabe teachings, recipes, and botanical information she shares in Plants Have So Much to Give Us, All We Have to Do Is Ask. Geniusz gained much of the knowledge she writes about from her years as an oshkaabewis, a traditionally trained apprentice, and as friend to the late Keewaydinoquay, an Anishinaabe medicine woman from the Leelanau Peninsula in Michigan and a scholar, teacher, and practitioner in the field of native ethnobotany. Keewaydinoquay published little in her lifetime, yet Geniusz has carried on her legacy by making this body of knowledge accessible to a broader audience. Geniusz teaches the ways she was taught--through stories. Sharing the traditional stories she learned at Keewaydinoquay's side as well as stories from other American Indian traditions and her own experiences, Geniusz brings the plants to life with narratives that explain their uses, meaning, and history. Stories such as "Naanabozho and the Squeaky-Voice Plant" place the plants in cultural context and illustrate the belief in plants as cognizant beings. Covering a wide range of plants, from conifers to cattails to medicinal uses of yarrow, mullein, and dandelion, she explains how we can work with those beings to create food, simple medicines, and practical botanical tools. Plants Have So Much to Give Us, All We Have to Do Is Ask makes this botanical information useful to native and nonnative healers and educators and places it in the context of the Anishinaabe culture that developed the knowledge and practice.

Plants Have So Much To Give Us All We Have To Do Is Ask

Author: Mary Siisip Geniusz
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780816696734
Size: 35.81 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 1007
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Mary Siisip Geniusz has spent more than thirty years working with, living with, and using the Anishinaabe teachings, recipes, and botanical information she shares in Plants Have So Much to Give Us, All We Have to Do Is Ask. Geniusz gained much of the knowledge she writes about from her years as an oshkaabewis, a traditionally trained apprentice, and as friend to the late Keewaydinoquay, an Anishinaabe medicine woman from the Leelanau Peninsula in Michigan and a scholar, teacher, and practitioner in the field of native ethnobotany. Keewaydinoquay published little in her lifetime, yet Geniusz has carried on her legacy by making this body of knowledge accessible to a broader audience. Geniusz teaches the ways she was taught--through stories. Sharing the traditional stories she learned at Keewaydinoquay's side as well as stories from other American Indian traditions and her own experiences, Geniusz brings the plants to life with narratives that explain their uses, meaning, and history. Stories such as "Naanabozho and the Squeaky-Voice Plant" place the plants in cultural context and illustrate the belief in plants as cognizant beings. Covering a wide range of plants, from conifers to cattails to medicinal uses of yarrow, mullein, and dandelion, she explains how we can work with those beings to create food, simple medicines, and practical botanical tools. Plants Have So Much to Give Us, All We Have to Do Is Ask makes this botanical information useful to native and nonnative healers and educators and places it in the context of the Anishinaabe culture that developed the knowledge and practice.

Our Knowledge Is Not Primitive

Author: Wendy Djinn Geniusz
Publisher: Syracuse University Press
ISBN: 9780815632047
Size: 39.90 MB
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Traditional Anishinaabe (Ojibwe or Chippewa) knowledge, like the knowledge systems of indigenous peoples around the world, has long been collected and presented by researchers who were not a part of the culture they observed. The result is a "colonized" version of the knowledge, one that is distorted and trivialized by an ill-suited Eurocentric paradigm of scientific investigation and classification. In Our Knowledge Is Not Primitive, Wendy Makoons Geniusz contrasts the way in which Anishinaabe botanical knowledge is presented in the academic record with how it is preserved in Anishinaabe culture. In doing so she seeks to open a dialogue between the two communities to discuss methods for decolonizing existing texts and to develop innovative approaches for conducting more culturally meaningful research in the future. As an Anishinaabe who grew up in a household practicing traditional medicine and who went on to earn a doctorate and become a professional scholar, Geniusz possesses the authority of someone with a foot firmly planted in each world. Her unique ability to navigate both indigenous and scientific perspectives makes this book an invaluable contribution to the field and enriches our understanding of all native communities.

Centering Anishinaabeg Studies

Author: Jill Doerfler
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 1609173538
Size: 77.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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For the Anishinaabeg people, who span a vast geographic region from the Great Lakes to the Plains and beyond, stories are vessels of knowledge. They are bagijiganan, offerings of the possibilities within Anishinaabeg life. Existing along a broad narrative spectrum, from aadizookaanag (traditional or sacred narratives) to dibaajimowinan (histories and news)—as well as everything in between—storytelling is one of the central practices and methods of individual and community existence. Stories create and understand, survive and endure, revitalize and persist. They honor the past, recognize the present, and provide visions of the future. In remembering, (re)making, and (re)writing stories, Anishinaabeg storytellers have forged a well-traveled path of agency, resistance, and resurgence. Respecting this tradition, this groundbreaking anthology features twenty-four contributors who utilize creative and critical approaches to propose that this people’s stories carry dynamic answers to questions posed within Anishinaabeg communities, nations, and the world at large. Examining a range of stories and storytellers across time and space, each contributor explores how narratives form a cultural, political, and historical foundation for Anishinaabeg Studies. Written by Anishinaabeg and non-Anishinaabeg scholars, storytellers, and activists, these essays draw upon the power of cultural expression to illustrate active and ongoing senses of Anishinaabeg life. They are new and dynamic bagijiganan, revealing a viable and sustainable center for Anishinaabeg Studies, what it has been, what it is, what it can be.

Cedar Songs

Author: Keewaydinoquay Peschel
Publisher: Trafford Publishing
ISBN: 1466986212
Size: 38.43 MB
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In the 1900s, most Indian children in the United States and Canada were involuntarily taken from their families by state and federal governments and placed in Indian boarding schools. Keewaydinoquay Peschel was able to escape this fate. This book offers a rare glimpse into what one little girl did with this incredible gift she had been given. She was a child of mixed cultures and religions with an insatiable curiosity about how and why things work. This often got her into trouble, but also provided some of her best stories. Keewaydinoquay grew up to become a world-renowned herbalist, teacher, medicine helper, writer, and storyteller. She spent her life helping all other beings, not just human beings. All these stories, as told in her own words, are from Keewaydinoquay for all of us. She lived these lessons and now shares them in hopes that we humans are ready to take seriously the responsibilities that are incurred by the honor of having our place among the families of creation.

Honoring The Medicine

Author: Kenneth Cohen
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 0345435133
Size: 29.59 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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An introduction to Native American medicine explores their healing traditions, philosophy, and methods, explaining how such fundamental therapies as counseling, massage, and more can be integrated with western medicine, how Native Americans understand healing therapies, and how the Native American approach can be interpreted, all from the perspective of a traditional healer. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.

Otter S Journey Through Indigenous Language And Law

Author: Lindsay Keegitah Borrows
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774836601
Size: 56.29 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Storytelling has the capacity to address feelings and demonstrate themes – to illuminate beyond argument and theoretical exposition. In Otter’s Journey, Borrows makes use of the Anishinaabe tradition of storytelling to explore how the work in Indigenous language revitalization can inform the emerging field of Indigenous legal revitalization. She follows Otter, a dodem (clan) relation from the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation, on a journey across Anishinaabe, Inuit, Māori, Coast Salish, and Abenaki territories, through a narrative of Indigenous resurgence. In doing so, she reveals that the processes, philosophies, and practices flowing from Indigenous languages and laws can emerge from under the layers of colonial laws, policies, and languages to become guiding principles in people’s contemporary lives.

Varla Ventura S Paranormal Parlor

Author: Varla Ventura
Publisher: Weiser Books
ISBN: 1633410781
Size: 31.64 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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From shimmering specters to mysterious tricks, Varla Ventura’s Paranormal Parlorincludes original supernatural tales, classic ghost stories, legends, hauntings, séances, superstitions, and death customs. This book showcases a chilling collection of startling ghost stories as told to the author as well as legendary ghosts and haunted locations and an overview of the paranormal parlor games that rose to popularity in the Victorian and Edwardian eras. It also includes hidden history such as the story of Mark Twain’s ghost, and the quiet horror writings of the architect who started the Gothic Revival movement (Ralph Adams Cram).