Pottery Analysis Second Edition

Author: Prudence M. Rice
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226923223
Size: 28.53 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Just as a single pot starts with a lump of clay, the study of a piece’s history must start with an understanding of its raw materials. This principle is the foundation of Pottery Analysis, the acclaimed sourcebook that has become the indispensable guide for archaeologists and anthropologists worldwide. By grounding current research in the larger history of pottery and drawing together diverse approaches to the study of pottery, it offers a rich, comprehensive view of ceramic inquiry. This new edition fully incorporates more than two decades of growth and diversification in the fields of archaeological and ethnographic study of pottery. It begins with a summary of the origins and history of pottery in different parts of the world, then examines the raw materials of pottery and their physical and chemical properties. It addresses ethnographic and ethnoarchaeological perspectives on pottery production; reviews the methods of studying pottery’s physical, mechanical, thermal, mineralogical, and chemical properties; and discusses how proper analysis of artifacts can reveal insights into their culture of origin. Intended for use in the classroom, the lab, and out in the field, this essential text offers an unparalleled basis for pottery research.

Pottery Analysis

Author: Prudence M. Rice
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780226711164
Size: 76.91 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5784
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A rich and comprehensive sourcebook, PotteryAnalysis draws together diverse approaches to the study of pottery—archaeological, ethnographic, stylistic, functional, and physicochemical. Prudence M. Rice uses pottery as a starting point for insights into people and culture and examines in detail the methods for studying these fired clay vessels that have been used worldwide from prehistoric times to the present. Pottery Analysis is a classic in its field as well as an invaluable reference for all students of archaeology and ancient culture.

Pottery Analysis Second Edition

Author: Prudence M. Rice
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226923208
Size: 34.77 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 4675
Download Read Online
Just as a single pot starts with a lump of clay, the study of a piece’s history must start with an understanding of its raw materials. This principle is the foundation of Pottery Analysis, the acclaimed sourcebook that has become the indispensable guide for archaeologists and anthropologists worldwide. By grounding current research in the larger history of pottery and drawing together diverse approaches to the study of pottery, it offers a rich, comprehensive view of ceramic inquiry. This new edition fully incorporates more than two decades of growth and diversification in the fields of archaeological and ethnographic study of pottery. It begins with a summary of the origins and history of pottery in different parts of the world, then examines the raw materials of pottery and their physical and chemical properties. It addresses ethnographic and ethnoarchaeological perspectives on pottery production; reviews the methods of studying pottery’s physical, mechanical, thermal, mineralogical, and chemical properties; and discusses how proper analysis of artifacts can reveal insights into their culture of origin. Intended for use in the classroom, the lab, and out in the field, this essential text offers an unparalleled basis for pottery research.

Pottery In Archaeology

Author: Clive Orton
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107433932
Size: 43.13 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 3208
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This revised edition provides an up-to-date account of the many different kinds of information that can be obtained through the archaeological study of pottery. It describes the scientific and quantitative techniques that are now available to the archaeologist, and assesses their value for answering a range of archaeological questions. It provides a manual for the basic handling and archiving of excavated pottery so that it can be used as a basis for further studies. The whole is set in the historical context of the ways in which archaeologists have sought to gain evidence from pottery and continue to do so. There are case studies of several approaches and techniques, backed up by an extensive bibliography.

Approaches To Archaeological Ceramics

Author: Carla M. Sinopoli
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1475792743
Size: 25.51 MB
Format: PDF
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More than any other category of evidence, ceramics ofters archaeologists their most abundant and potentially enlightening source of information on the past. Being made primarily of day, a relatively inexpensive material that is available in every region, ceramics became essential in virtually every society in the world during the past ten thousand years. The straightfor ward technology of preparing, forming, and firing day into hard, durable shapes has meant that societies at various levels of complexity have come to rely on it for a wide variety of tasks. Ceramic vessels quickly became essential for many household and productive tasks. Food preparation, cooking, and storage-the very basis of settled village life-could not exist as we know them without the use of ceramic vessels. Often these vessels broke into pieces, but the virtually indestructible quality of the ceramic material itself meant that these pieces would be preserved for centuries, waiting to be recovered by modem archaeologists. The ability to create ceramic material with diverse physical properties, to form vessels into so many different shapes, and to decorate them in limitless manners, led to their use in far more than utilitarian contexts. Some vessels were especially made to be used in trade, manufacturing activities, or rituals, while ceramic material was also used to make other items such as figurines, models, and architectural ornaments.

Ceramic Theory And Cultural Process

Author: Dean E. Arnold
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521272599
Size: 79.47 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A theory of ceramics that elucidates the complex relationship between culture, pottery and society.

Ceramic Petrography

Author: Patrick Sean Quinn
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781905739592
Size: 57.58 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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"...this book illustrates the spectrum of compostional and microstructural phenomena that occur within ancient ceramics under the microscope and provides comprehensive guidelines for their study within archaeology."--Back cover.

Symbols In Action

Author: Ian Hodder
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521241762
Size: 51.57 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Material culture - the objects made by man - provides the primary data from which archaeologists have to infer the economies, technologies, social organization and ritual practices of extinct societies. The analysis and interpretation ofmaterial culture is therefore central to any concern with archaeological theory and methodology, and in order to understand better the relationship between material culture and human behaviour, archaeologists need to draw upon models derived from the study of ethnographic societies. First published in 1982, this book presents the results of a series of field investigations carried out in Kenya, Zambia and the Sudan into the 'archaeological' remains and material culture of contemporary small-scale societies, and demonstrates the way in which objects are used as symbols within social action and within particular world views and ideologies.

Tribal Cultural Resource Management

Author: Darby C. Stapp
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 075911644X
Size: 75.62 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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The entrance of Native Americans into the world of cultural resource management is forcing a change in the traditional paradigms that have guided archaeologists, anthropologists, and other CRM professionals. This book examines these developments from tribal perspectives and articulates native views on the identification of cultural resource, how they should be handled and by whom, and what their meaning is in contemporary life. Stapp and Burney also demonstrate the connections between cultural resource and other issues such as native sovereignty, economic development, human rights, and cultural integrity.