Reasoning With Democratic Values 2 0

Author: David E. Harris
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780807759288
Size: 41.28 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The extensively updated and revised edition of Reasoning with Democratic Values 2.0 presents an engaging approach to teachiing U.S. history that promotes critical thinking and social responsibillity. In Volume 1, students investigate 20 significant historical episodes, arranged chronologically, beginning with the colonial era and ending with Reconstruction. A comprehensive Instructor's Manual is available.

The People S School

Author: William Robbins
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780870718984
Size: 48.98 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The People's School is a comprehensive history of Oregon State University, placing the institution's story in the context of state, regional, national, and international history. Rather than organizing the narrative around presidencies, historian William Robbins examines the broader context of events, such as wars and economic depressions, that affected life on the Corvallis campus. Agrarian revolts in the last quarter of the nineteenth century affected every Western state, including Oregon. The Spanish-American War, the First World War, the Great Depression of the 1930s, and the Second World War disrupted institutional life, influencing enrollment, curricular strategies, and the number of faculty and staff. Peacetime events, such as Oregon's tax policies, also circumscribed course offerings, hiring and firing, and the allocation of funds to departments, schools, and colleges. This contextual approach is not to suggest that university presidents are unimportant. Benjamin Arnold (1872-1892), appointed president of Corvallis College by the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, served well beyond the date (1885) when the State of Oregon assumed control of the agricultural college. Robbins uses central administration records and grassroots sources--local and state newspapers, student publications (The Barometer, The Beaver), and multiple and wide-ranging materials published in the university's digitized [email protected], a source for the scholarly work of faculty, students, and materials related to the institution's mission and research activities. Other voices--extracurricular developments, local and state politics, campus reactions to national crises--provide intriguing and striking addendums to the university's rich history.

Keeping Faith With The Constitution

Author: Goodwin Liu
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199752836
Size: 70.14 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Chief Justice John Marshall argued that a constitution "requires that only its great outlines should be marked [and] its important objects designated." Ours is "intended to endure for ages to come, and consequently, to be adapted to the various crises of human affairs." In recent years, Marshall's great truths have been challenged by proponents of originalism and strict construction. Such legal thinkers as Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia argue that the Constitution must be construed and applied as it was when the Framers wrote it. In Keeping Faith with the Constitution, three legal authorities make the case for Marshall's vision. They describe their approach as "constitutional fidelity"--not to how the Framers would have applied the Constitution, but to the text and principles of the Constitution itself. The original understanding of the text is one source of interpretation, but not the only one; to preserve the meaning and authority of the document, to keep it vital, applications of the Constitution must be shaped by precedent, historical experience, practical consequence, and societal change. The authors range across the history of constitutional interpretation to show how this approach has been the source of our greatest advances, from Brown v. Board of Education to the New Deal, from the Miranda decision to the expansion of women's rights. They delve into the complexities of voting rights, the malapportionment of legislative districts, speech freedoms, civil liberties and the War on Terror, and the evolution of checks and balances. The Constitution's framers could never have imagined DNA, global warming, or even women's equality. Yet these and many more realities shape our lives and outlook. Our Constitution will remain vital into our changing future, the authors write, if judges remain true to this rich tradition of adaptation and fidelity.

The Ethics Challenge In Public Service

Author: Carol W. Lewis
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118228766
Size: 26.61 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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This thoroughly revised and updated third edition of The Ethics Challenge in Public Service is the classic ethics text used in public management programs nationwide. The book serves as a valuable resource for public managers who work in a world that presents numerous ethical challenges every day. It is filled with a wealth of practical tools and strategies that public managers can use when making ethical choices in the ambiguous and pressured world of public service. The book also contains new material on topics such as social networking, the use of apology, ethics as applied to public policy, working with elected officials, and more. "The Ethics Challenge in Public Service, now in its third edition, continues to be simply indispensable for teaching public service ethics. Thoroughly updated to encompass the latest developments in the field, this new edition adds both a companion website and an instructor's website, further enhancing its value for both students and faculty." —Guy B. Adams, Harry S. Truman School of Public Affairs, University of Missouri "If you want to know about ethical decision making in public service, this is the book to read." —Patricia J. Harned, president, Ethics Resource Center "This book cuts through the rhetoric and the partisanship right to the heart of ethics in the public service; here is a smooth blend of how and why." —Carole L. Jurkiewicz, Woman's Hospital Distinguished Professor of Healthcare Management, John W. Dupuy Endowed Professor, Louisiana State University

Civil Disobedience

Author: Henry David Thoreau
Publisher: Broadview Press
ISBN: 1770486399
Size: 30.42 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In 1848, Henry David Thoreau twice delivered lectures in Concord, Massachusetts, on “the relationship of the individual to the state.” The essay now known as Civil Disobedience is a significant and widely admired contribution to abolitionist literature, as well as an anti-war tract, but Thoreau’s focus is less on political organization and solidarity than it is on personal choice and individual responsibility. Cultivating personal integrity in the face of political injustice is the project Thoreau defends in Civil Disobedience; this focus has made the work highly influential for twentieth- and twenty-first-century political movements. Bob Pepperman Taylor’s new Introduction explains the work’s specific political context, helping readers to understand the text as Thoreau wrote it. The edition also offers a number of historical documents on Thoreau’s abolitionism; the war with Mexico; and Thoreau’s philosophical development in relation to other thinkers.