Rethinking Life At The Margins

Author: Michele Lancione
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317063996
Size: 60.85 MB
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Experimenting with new ways of looking at the contexts, subjects, processes and multiple political stances that make up life at the margins, this book provides a novel source for a critical rethinking of marginalisation. Drawing on post-colonialism and critical assemblage thinking, the rich ethnographic works presented in the book trace the assemblage of marginality in multiple case-studies encompassing the Global North and South. These works are united by the approach developed in the book, characterised by the refusal of a priori definitions and by a post-human and grounded take on the assemblage of life. The result is a nuanced attention to the potential expressed by everyday articulations and a commitment to produce a processual, vitalist and non-normative cultural politics of the margins. The reader will find in this book unique challenges accepted and authoritative thinking, and provides new insights into researching life at the margins.

Marx At The Margins

Author: Kevin B. Anderson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226019845
Size: 25.72 MB
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In Marx at the Margins, Kevin Anderson uncovers a variety of extensive but neglected texts by the well-known political economist which cast what we thought we knew about his work in a startlingly different light. Analyzing a variety of Marx’s writings, including journalistic work written for the New York Tribune, Anderson presents us with a Marx quite at odds with our conventional interpretations. Rather than providing us with an account of Marx as an exclusively class-based thinker, Anderson here offers a portrait of Marx for the twenty-first century: a global theorist whose social critique was sensitive to the varieties of human social and historical development, including not just class, but nationalism, race, and ethnicity, as well. Marx at the Margins ultimately argues that alongside his overarching critique of capital, Marx created a theory of history that was multi-layered and not easily reduced to a single model of development or revolution. Through highly-informed readings on work ranging from Marx’s unpublished 1879–82 notebooks to his passionate writings about the antislavery cause in the United States, this volume delivers a groundbreaking and canon-changing vision of Karl Marx that is sure to provoke lively debate in Marxist scholarship and beyond.

On The Move

Author: Tim Cresswell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415952557
Size: 68.97 MB
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On the Move presents a rich history of one of the key concepts of modern life: mobility. Increasing mobility has been a constant throughout the modern era, evident in mass car ownership, plane travel, and the rise of the Internet. Typically, people have equated increasing mobility with increasing freedom. However, as Cresswell shows, while mobility has certainly increased in modern times, attempts to control and restrict mobility are just as characteristic of modernity. Through a series of fascinating historical episodes Cresswell shows how mobility and its regulation have been central to the experience of modernity.

The Politics Of Possibility

Author: Louise Amoore
Publisher: Duke University Press Books
ISBN: 9780822355458
Size: 15.35 MB
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Since September 11, 2001, the imagination of "low probability, high consequence" events has become a distinctive feature of contemporary politics. Uncertain futures—devastation by terrorist attack, cyber crime, flood, financial market collapse—must be discerned and responded to as possibilities, however improbable they may be. In The Politics of Possibility, Louise Amoore examines this development, tracing its genealogy through the diverse worlds of risk management consulting, computer science, commercial logistics, and data visualization. She focuses on the increasingly symbiotic relationship between commercial opportunities and state security threats, a relation that turns the trusted, iris-scanned traveler into "a person of national security interest," and the designer of risk algorithms for casino and insurance fraud into a homeland security resource. Juxtaposing new readings of Agamben, Foucault, Derrida, Massumi, and Connolly with interpretations of post–9/11 novels and artworks, Amoore analyzes the "politics of possibility" and its far-reaching implications for society, associative life, and political accountability.

A Companion To Political Geography

Author: John A. Agnew
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470998938
Size: 70.43 MB
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A Companion to Political Geography presents students and researchers with a substantial survey of this active and vibrant field. Introduces the best thinking in contemporary political geography. Contributions written by scholars whose work has helped to shape the discipline. Includes work at the cutting edge of the field. Covers the latest theoretical developments.

Cultural Memories

Author: Peter Meusburger
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9789048189458
Size: 53.50 MB
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The revival of interest in collective cultural memories since the 1980s has been a genuinely global phenomenon. Cultural memories can be defined as the social constructions of the past that allow individuals and groups to orient themselves in time and space. The investigation of cultural memories has necessitated an interdisciplinary perspective, though geographical questions about the spaces, places, and landscapes of memory have acquired a special significance. The essays in this volume, written by leading anthropologists, geographers, historians, and psychologists, open a range of new interpretations of the formation and development of cultural memories from ancient times to the present day. The volume is divided into five interconnected sections. The first section outlines the theoretical considerations that have shaped recent debates about cultural memory. The second section provides detailed case studies of three key themes: the founding myths of the nation-state, the contestation of national collective memories during periods of civil war, and the oral traditions that move beyond national narrative. The third section examines the role of World War II as a pivotal episode in an emerging European cultural memory. The fourth section focuses on cultural memories in postcolonial contexts beyond Europe. The fifth and final section extends the study of cultural memory back into premodern tribal and nomadic societies.

Hybrid Geographies

Author: Sarah Whatmore
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1847876781
Size: 15.92 MB
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`Hybrid Geographies is one of the most original and important contributions to our field in the last 30 years. At once immensley provocative and productive, it is written with uncommon clarity and grace, and promises to breathe new life not only into geographical inquiry but into critical practice across the spectrum of the humanities and social sciences - and beyond. An extraordinary achievement' - Professor Derek Gregory, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia Hybrid Geographies critically examines the `opposition' between nature and culture, the material and the social, as represented in scientific, environmental and popular discourses. Demonstrating that the world is not an exclusively human achievement, Hybrid Geographies reconsiders the relation between human and non-human, the social and the material, showing how they are intimately and variously linked. General arguments - informed by work in critical geography, feminist theory, environmental ethics, and science studies - are illustrated throughout with detailed case-study material. This exemplifies the two core themes of the book: a consideration of hybridity (the human/non-human relation) and of the `fault-lines' in the spatial organization of society and nature. Hybrid Geographies is essential reading for students in the social sciences with an interest in nature, space and social theory.

Becoming Earth

Author: Anne Reinertsen
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9463004297
Size: 56.61 MB
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Becoming earth is about how we can write and tell stories in a way that allows us to collaborate and be stewards and partners of the (natural) world – our earth – rather than dominators of it. That is what this assemblage is about: about trying to take seriously the minor politics of sensing, experimenting with questions of attending and attuning to difference, contestation, nomadism, relationality, and permeability in sensing cultivating muchness, newness, communities of acceptance and decision making. Going beyond the binaries, dualisms, instrumentalist criteria, etc., and supplying third space conceptions of agency not tied to human action alone, but rather examining human and more-than human relational assemblages of affecting and being affected. The tasks for educators becoming not merely people who pass on traditions, institutions, systems and/or structures, but prepare for future contingent events ultimately creates vital pedagogies of many prospects in our classrooms and exceeds forms of contracts between generations. These are embodied ecologies and/or enacting ecologies in practice showing the practical and political strength of new materialisms and presenting its potential and usefulness to simultaneously work and analyse local and global political strategies and sustainability. Making virtuality productive as a form of life: our wonderings are thus always stronger than our assertions. The sometimes fierce stories in this book might light some paths.

Across The Margins

Author: Glenda Norquay
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 9780719057496
Size: 39.40 MB
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Contributors to this text discuss what it is to be British or Irish, and how people come to describe themselves as such. The study offers a comparative, theoretically informed analysis of the cultural formation of the Atlantic Archipelago, working across the disciplines of history, geography, literature and cultural studies. It also includes specific case-studies on contemporary poetry, fiction, drama, popular music and art. The essaye respond to recent constitutional developments in Great Britain and Ireland, exploring their implications both for the cultural negotiation of marginality and for established critical paradigms.

Migration Squatting And Radical Autonomy

Author: Pierpaolo Mudu
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317375769
Size: 14.10 MB
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This book offers a unique contribution, exploring how the intersections among migrants and radical squatter’s movements have evolved over past decades. The complexity and importance of squatting practices are analyzed from a bottom-up perspective, to demonstrate how the spaces of squatting can be transformed by migrants. With contributions from scholars, scholar-activists, and activists, this book provides unique insights into how squatting has offered an alternative to dominant anti-immigrant policies, and the implications of squatting on the social acceptance of migrants. It illustrates the different mechanisms of protest followed in solidarity by migrant squatters and Social Center activists, when discrimination comes from above or below, and explores how can different spatialities be conceived and realized by radical practices. Contributions adopt a variety of perspectives, from critical human geography, social movement studies, political sociology, urban anthropology, autonomous Marxism, feminism, open localism, anarchism and post-structuralism, to analyze and contextualize migrants and squatters’ exclusion and social justice issues. This book is a timely and original contribution through its exploration of migrations, squatting and radical autonomy.