The Cambridge History Of Latina O American Literature

Author: John Morán González
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316872203
Size: 74.34 MB
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The Cambridge History of Latina/o American Literature emphasizes the importance of understanding Latina/o literature not simply as a US ethnic phenomenon but more broadly as an important element of a trans-American literary imagination. Engaging with the dynamics of migration, linguistic and cultural translation, and the uneven distribution of resources across the Americas that characterize Latina/o literature, the essays in this History provide a critical overview of key texts, authors, themes, and contexts as discussed by leading scholars in the field. This book demonstrates the relevance of Latina/o literature for a world defined by the migration of people, commodities, and cultural expressions.

The Cambridge History Of Latin American Literature

Author: Roberto Gonzalez Echevarría
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521340694
Size: 55.12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Primary and vital resource for literary specialists, historians, students of all levels, and general readers interested in this period. Leading scholars write about diverse genres (narrative, essay, poetry, theater) and cultural interests and ideas (intellectual life, historiography, Viceregal culture, Mesoamerican indigenous peoples and cultures). Literature articles include analysis and discussion of canonic and previously marginalized authors and treat representative works, genres, and literary and philosophical currents. Extremely useful, well written, and interesting"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

Border Renaissance

Author: John Morán González
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292778996
Size: 28.62 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Texas Centennial of 1936, commemorated by statewide celebrations of independence from Mexico, proved to be a powerful catalyst for the formation of a distinctly Mexican American identity. Confronted by a media frenzy that vilified "Meskins" as the antithesis of Texan liberty, Mexican Americans created literary responses that critiqued these racialized representations while forging a new bilingual, bicultural community within the United States. The development of a modern Tejana identity, controversies surrounding bicultural nationalism, and other conflictual aspects of the transformation from mexicano to Mexican American are explored in this study. Capturing this fascinating aesthetic and political rebirth, Border Renaissance presents innovative readings of important novels by María Elena Zamora O'Shea, Américo Paredes, and Jovita González. In addition, the previously overlooked literary texts by members of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) are given their first detailed consideration in this compelling work of intellectual and literary history. Drawing on extensive archival research in the English and Spanish languages, John Morán González revisits the 1930s as a crucial decade for the vibrant Mexican American reclamation of Texas history. Border Renaissance pays tribute to this vital turning point in the Mexican American struggle for civil rights.

The Cambridge History Of American Women S Literature

Author: Dale M. Bauer
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316176002
Size: 55.50 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The field of American women's writing is one characterized by innovation: scholars are discovering new authors and works, as well as new ways of historicizing this literature, rethinking contexts, categories and juxtapositions. Now, after three decades of scholarly investigation and innovation, the rich complexity and diversity of American literature written by women can be seen with a new coherence and subtlety. Dedicated to this expanding heterogeneity, The Cambridge History of American Women's Literature develops and challenges historical, cultural, theoretical, even polemical methods, all of which will advance the future study of American women writers – from Native Americans to postmodern communities, from individual careers to communities of writers and readers. This volume immerses readers in a new dialogue about the range and depth of women's literature in the United States and allows them to trace the ever-evolving shape of the field.

The Cambridge Companion To The Literature Of New York

Author: Cyrus R. K. Patell
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139825410
Size: 18.92 MB
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New York holds a special place in America's national mythology as both the gateway to the USA and as a diverse, vibrant cultural center distinct from the rest of the nation. From the international atmosphere of the Dutch colony New Amsterdam, through the expansion of the city in the nineteenth century, to its unique appeal to artists and writers in the twentieth, New York has given its writers a unique perspective on American culture. This Companion explores the range of writing and performance in the city, celebrating Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Edith Wharton, Eugene O'Neill, and Allen Ginsberg among a host of authors who have contributed to the city's rich literary and cultural history. Illustrated and featuring a chronology and guide to further reading, this book is the ideal guide for students of American literature as well as for all who love New York and its writers.