The Economist Style Guide

Author:
Publisher: Economist Books
ISBN: 9781846686061
Size: 78.55 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Offers general advice on writing, points out common errors and cliches, offers guidance on consistent use of punctuation, abbreviations and capital letters, and contains a range of reference material - covering topics ranging from accountancy ratios and stock market indices to laws of nature and science. [http://www.payot.ch/].

The Economist Style Guide

Author: Economist Books Staff
Publisher: Economist Books
ISBN: 9781781253120
Size: 79.13 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1207
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An updated and refreshed edition of this bestselling guide to English usage.

The Economist Style Guide

Author: The Economist
Publisher: Wiley
ISBN: 9781846681752
Size: 62.63 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3314
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The first requirement of The Economist is that it should be readily understandable. Clear writing is the key to clear thinking. So think what you want to say, then say it as simply as possible. Readers are primarily interested in what you are saying. The way you say it may encourage them either to read on or to give up. If you want them to read on, then: Catch their attention Do not spend sentences setting the scene or sketching in the background. Hold the reader by the way you unfold the tale and by fresh and unpretentious use of language. Read through your writing several times Edit it ruthlessly. Cut out anything superfluous. Unadorned, unfancy prose is usually all you need. Do not be stuffy Use the language of everyday speech, not that of spokesmen, lawyers or bureaucrats. Do not be hectoring or arrogant Nobody needs to be described as silly: let your analysis prove that he is. Do not be pleased with yourself Don't boast of your own cleverness by telling readers that you correctly predicted something or that you have a scoop. You are more likely to bore or irritate than to impress them. Do not be too chatty Surprise, surprise is more irritating than informative. Do not be too didactic Avoid sentences that begin Compare, Consider, Expect, Imagine, Remember or Take. Do your best to be lucid Simple sentences help.

The Economist Style Guide

Author: The Economist
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 178283348X
Size: 17.68 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5086
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Over a million copies sold Clear writing is the key to clear thinking. So think what you want to say, then say it as simply as possible. That's the thinking that underpins this much-loved guide, and the mantra for anyone wanting to communicate with the clarity, style and precision for which The Economist is renowned. The Economist Style Guide guides the reader through the pleasures and pitfalls of English usage. It offers advice on the consistent use of punctuation, abbreviations and capital letters, identifies common errors and clichs and contains an exhaustive range of reference material - covering everything from business ratios to mathematical symbols and common Latin phrases. It also tackles the key differences between British and American English. But this is no ordinary guide to English usage. It has a wit, verve and flair which make it much more than a simple work of reference. Here are just some examples: - anticipate does not mean expect. Jack and Jill expected to marry; if they anticipated marriage, only Jill might find herself expectant. - Take care with between. To fall between two stools, however painful, is grammatically acceptable. To fall between the cracks is to challenge the laws of physics. - critique is a noun. If you want a verb, try criticise. - use words with care. If This door is alarmed, does its hair stand on end? The Economist Style Guide is required reading for anyone who wants to communicate with style.

The Economist Style Guide

Author: Ann Wroe
Publisher: Economist Books
ISBN: 9781781258316
Size: 41.95 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 1586
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Clear writing is the key to clear thinking. So think what you want to say, then say it as simply as possible.That's the thinking that underpins this much-loved guide, and the mantra for anyone wanting to communicate with the clarity, style and precision for which The Economist is renowned. The Economist Style Guide guides the reader through the pleasures and pitfalls of English usage. It offers advice on the consistent use of punctuation, abbreviations and capital letters, identifies common errors and clichés and contains an exhaustive range of reference material - covering everything from business ratios to mathematical symbols and common Latin phrases. It also tackles the key differences between British and American English. But this is no ordinary guide to English usage. It has a wit, verve and flair which make it much more than a simple work of reference. Here are just some examples: - anticipate does not mean expect. Jack and Jill expected to marry; if they anticipated marriage, only Jill might find herself expectant.- Take care with between. To fall between two stools, however painful, is grammatically acceptable. To fall between the cracks is to challenge the laws of physics.- critique is a noun. If you want a verb, try criticise.- use words with care. If This door is alarmed, does its hair stand on end? The Economist Style Guide is required reading for anyone who wants to communicate with style.

The Economist Numbers Guide 6th Edition

Author: The Economist
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 1847659349
Size: 75.67 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2440
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Designed as a companion to The Economist Style Guide, the best-selling guide to writing style, The Economist Numbers Guide is invaluable for everyone who has to work with numbers, which in today's commercially focussed world means most managers. In addition to general advice on basic numeracy, the guide points out common errors and explains the recognised techniques for solving financial problems, analysing information of any kind, forecasting and effective decision making. Over 100 charts, graphs, tables and feature boxes highlight key points, and great emphasis is put on the all-important aspect of how you present and communicate numerical information effectively and honestly. At the back of the book is an extensive A-Z dictionary of terms covering everything from amortisation to zero-sum game. Whatever your business, whatever your management role, for anyone who needs a good head for figures The Economist Numbers Guide will prove invaluable.

Style Guide

Author: The Economist
Publisher: The Economist
ISBN: 1610399862
Size: 32.78 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 412
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This expanded twelfth edition of the bestselling guide to style is based on The Economist's own updated house style manual, and is an invaluable companion for everyone who wants to communicate with the clarity, style and precision for which The Economist is renowned. As the introduction says, 'clarity of writing usually follows clarity of thought.' The Economist Style Guide gives general advice on writing, points out common errors and clichés, offers guidance on consistent use of punctuation, abbreviations and capital letters and contains an exhaustive range of reference material--covering everything from accountancy ratios and stock market indices to laws of nature and science. Some of the numerous useful rules and common mistakes pointed out in the guide include: Which informs, that defines. This is the house that Jack built. But: This house, which Jack built, is now falling down. Discreet means circumspect or prudent; discrete means separate or distinct. Remember that "Questions are never indiscreet. Answers sometimes are" (Oscar Wilde). Flaunt means display, flout means disdain. If you flout this distinction you will flaunt your ignorance. Forgo means do without; forego means go before. Fortuitous means accidental, not fortunate or well-timed. Times: Take care. Three times more than X is four times as much as X. Full stops: Use plenty. They keep sentences short. This helps the reader.

Guide To Financial Markets

Author: Marc Levinson
Publisher: Economist Books
ISBN: 9781846681738
Size: 65.36 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Extensively revised and updated following the credit crunch that began in 2007 and the financial crisis that erupted in 2008, the 5th edition of this highly regarded book, brings the reader right up to speed with the latest developments in financial instruments and provides a clear and incisive guide to this complex world that even those who work in it often find hard to understand.With chapters on the markets that deal with money, foreign exchange, equities, bonds, commodities, financial futures, options and other derivatives, it looks at why these markets exist, how they work and who trades in them, and it gives a run-down of the factors that affect prices and rates.Business history is littered with disasters that occurred because people involved their firms in financial markets they didn't properly understand. Read this book and you and your company won't be new additions to this list. A fabulous source of reference for anyone wishing to understand financial markets - there is no better guide.

A Guide For The Young Economist

Author: William Thomson
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 026220133X
Size: 36.65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In clear, concise language—a model for what he advocates—William Thomson shows how to make written and oral presentations both inviting and efficient.

The Economist Style Guide

Author: The Economist
Publisher: Wiley
ISBN:
Size: 55.59 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6430
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An authoritative reference on clear, concise writing Witty, concise, and enlightening, The Economist Style Guide is an authoritative resource for all your written communications. Based on the style guide used by the writers for the renowned international business journal acclaimed for its crisp, clear writing, this practical guide offers unerring guidance on grammar, usage, and style in business communications. Providing sage advice on writing in general ("Use the language of everyday speech"; "Long paragraphs, like long sentences, confuse the reader"; "Don't overdo the use of don't, isn't, can't, won't, etc."), the Guide clarifies such perpetual questions as: compare with (emphasizes differences) and compare to (similarities) different---used with from, not to or than affect (to have an influence on) and effect (to accomplish) There's also invaluable information on international business terms and abbreviations, political and geographical facts, units of measurement, currencies, trade classifications, differences between American and British English, and much more. In today's high-speed business environment, the ability to communicate clearly, accurately, and concisely is essential to professional success. The Economist Style Guide has become the reference of choice for businesspeople everywhere who need practical, authoritative advice on how to improve their written communications. Developed from the style guide used by those who work for The Economist—the international business journal renowned for its writing excellence—this handy resource provides easily accessible answers to the numerous questions of usage, grammar, and style that frequently arise in the course of a business day. Offering invaluable guidance on the principles of good writing, The Economist Style Guide defines commonly misused words and expressions, and explains the correct use of punctuation, abbreviations, capital letters, and more —all illustrated with an abundance of amusing examples. As an aid to those engaged in international business, the Guide supplies a wealth of handy reference material on such areas as units of measurement, political and geographical terms, currencies, trade classifications, differences between American and British English, and much more. Whether you are dashing off a quick e-mail message or preparing a formal report, The Economist Style Guide will help you hone your language skills and sharpen all your business communications. It is an indispensable aid to clarity and precision that will prove its value again and again as the reference book you'll keep within reach whenever you write.