The Warren Court And The Pursuit Of Justice

Author: Morton J. Horwitz
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780809016259
Size: 12.37 MB
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The Hill and Wang Critical Issues Series: concise, affordable works on pivotal topics in American history, society, and politics. The men who made up the Supreme Court when Earl Warren was Chief Justice (1953-69) changed America forever, and their decisions are still affecting constitutional law today. This overview of the Warren Court focuses on its landmark cases and enduring legacy.

The Warren Court In Historical And Political Perspective

Author: Mark V. Tushnet
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813916651
Size: 20.72 MB
Format: PDF
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The tenure of Earl Warren as chief justice of the United States Supreme Court (1953-69) was marked by a series of decisions unique in the history of the Court for the progressive agenda they bespoke. What made the Warren Court special? How can students of history and political science understand the Warren Court as part of constitutional history and politics? To answer such questions, nine well-known legal scholars and historians explore how each justice contributed to the distinctiveness of the Warren Court in Supreme Court history.

The Long Bitter Trail

Author: Anthony Wallace
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 9781429934275
Size: 54.41 MB
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An account of Andrew Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830, which relocated Eastern Indians to the Okalahoma Territory over the Trail of Tears, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs which was given control over their lives.

Inside The Warren Court

Author: Bernard Schwartz
Publisher: Doubleday
ISBN:
Size: 63.26 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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A behind-the-scenes look at the workings of the Supreme Court, between 1953 and 1969, under the leadership of Chief Justice Earl Warren discusses the members of the court, its operation, and the critical judicial decisions made

The Columbia Guide To America In The 1960s

Author: David Farber
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231518072
Size: 22.55 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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With interesting facts, statistics, and comparisons presented in almanac style as well as the expertise of prominent scholars, The Columbia Guide to America in the 1960s is the most complete guide to an enduringly fascinating era.

Constructing Civil Liberties

Author: Ken I. Kersch
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521010559
Size: 18.24 MB
Format: PDF
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This book provides a revisionist account of the genealogy of contemporary constitutional law and morals.

The Specter Of Communism

Author: Melvyn P. Leffler
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1429952350
Size: 49.52 MB
Format: PDF
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The Hill and Wang Critical Issues Series: concise, affordable works on pivotal topics in American history, society, and politics. The Specter of Communism is a concise history of the origins of the Cold War and the evolution of U.S.-Soviet relations, from the Bolshevik revolution to the death of Stalin. Using not only American documents but also those from newly opened archives in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, Leffler shows how the ideological animosity that existed from Lenin's seizure of power onward turned into dangerous confrontation. By focusing on American political culture and American anxieties about the Soviet political and economic threat, Leffler suggests new ways of understanding the global struggle staged by the two great powers of the postwar era.

Lyndon Johnson S War

Author: Michael H. Hunt
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 9781429930680
Size: 36.86 MB
Format: PDF
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The Hill and Wang Critical Issues Series: concise, affordable works on pivotal topics in American history, society, and politics. Using newly available documents from both American and Vietnamese archives, Hunt reinterprets the values, choices, misconceptions, and miscalculations that shaped the long process of American intervention in Southeast Asia, and renders more comprehensible--if no less troubling--the tangled origins of the war.

On Democracy S Doorstep The Inside Story Of How The Supreme Court Brought One Person One Vote To The United States

Author: J. Douglas Smith
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 0374712085
Size: 17.25 MB
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Winner of the Henry Adams Prize from the Society for History in the Federal Government A Washington Post Notable Work of Nonfiction A Slate Best Book of 2014 The inside story of the Supreme Court decisions that brought true democracy to the United States As chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, Earl Warren is most often remembered for landmark rulings in favor of desegregation and the rights of the accused. But Warren himself identified a lesser known group of cases—Baker v. Carr, Reynolds v. Sims, and their companions—as his most important work. J. Douglas Smith's On Democracy's Doorstep masterfully recounts the tumultuous and often overlooked events that established the principle of "one person, one vote" in the United States. Before the Warren Court acted, American democracy was in poor order. As citizens migrated to urban areas, legislative boundaries remained the same, giving rural lawmakers from sparsely populated districts disproportionate political power—a power they often used on behalf of influential business interests. Smith shows how activists ranging from city boosters in Tennessee to the League of Women Voters worked to end malapportionment, incurring the wrath of chambers of commerce and southern segregationists as they did so. Despite a conspiracy of legislative inaction and a 1946 Supreme Court decision that instructed the judiciary not to enter the "political thicket," advocates did not lose hope. As Smith shows, they skillfully used the Fourteenth Amendment's Equal Protection Clause to argue for radical judicial intervention. Smith vividly depicts the unfolding drama as Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy pressed for change, Solicitor General Archibald Cox cautiously held back, young clerks pushed the justices toward ever-bolder reform, and the powerful Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen obsessively sought to reverse the judicial revolution that had upended state governments from California to Virginia. Today, following the Court's recent controversial decisions on voting rights and campaign finance, the battles described in On Democracy's Doorstep have increasing relevance. With erudition and verve, Smith illuminates this neglected episode of American political history and confronts its profound consequences.

Brown V Board Of Education At Fifty

Author: Clarke Rountree
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739108543
Size: 49.93 MB
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The story of Brown v. Board of Education is a half-century old now and has been retold many times by historians, legal scholars, sociologists, and others. This collection of persuasive scholarly essays examines, for the first time, the role rhetorical theory played in the development of educational segregation. Contributors consider the NAACPOs development of a series of graduate school cases to challenge Plessy, analyze the Brown decision itself, assess the state response to Brown, and critique the two Supreme Court decisions implementing the Brown decision. By illustrating how rhetorical strategies created, sustained, challenged, and, ultimately, reversed educational segregation in the United States, this work demonstrates the real value of the rhetorical perspective and provides encouragement to those who wish to help further develop this emerging field of judicial rhetoric.