Waistland A R Evolutionary View Of Our Weight And Fitness Crisis

Author: Deirdre Barrett
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393066673
Size: 51.27 MB
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Harvard psychologist Deirdre Barrett tackles the obesity and fitness crisis from an evolutionary standpoint. In the modern jungle of burgers, couches, and remote controls, obesity is an enormous and growing epidemic. Weight-loss books and diet gurus urge us to "listen to our bodies," but our instincts are designed for the African savannah, not food courts. The sugary and fatty foods that we, as hunter-gatherers, are programmed to forage used to be hard to come by. Now they're as close as the vending machine down the hall. Radical changes are necessary and, fortunately, are biologically easier than small or gradual changes in diet. Barrett tells us how to reprogram our bodies, break food addictions, and ignore our attraction to "supernormal stimuli"—artificial creations that appeal to our instincts more than the natural objects they mimic. Barrett delves into scientific research—from animal ethology to evolution—to show the disastrous direction in which our instincts have led us, and how, using our intellect, we can get back on course.

Supernormal Stimuli How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose

Author: Deirdre Barrett
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393077330
Size: 32.30 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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A Harvard psychologist explains how our once-helpful instincts get hijacked in our garish modern world. Our instincts—for food, sex, or territorial protection— evolved for life on the savannahs 10,000 years ago, not in today’s world of densely populated cities, technological innovations, and pollution. We now have access to a glut of larger-than-life objects, from candy to pornography to atomic weapons—that gratify these gut instincts with often-dangerous results. Animal biologists coined the term “supernormal stimuli” to describe imitations that appeal to primitive instincts and exert a stronger pull than real things, such as soccer balls that geese prefer over eggs. Evolutionary psychologist Deirdre Barrett applies this concept to the alarming disconnect between human instinct and our created environment, demonstrating how supernormal stimuli are a major cause of today’s most pressing problems, including obesity and war. However, Barrett does more than show how unfettered instincts fuel dangerous excesses. She also reminds us that by exercising self-control we can rein them in, potentially saving ourselves and civilization.

Dragon In The Tropics

Author: Javier Corrales
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 9780815705024
Size: 43.43 MB
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Since he was first elected in 1999, Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez Frías has reshaped a frail but nonetheless pluralistic democracy into a semi-authoritarian regime—an outcome achieved with spectacularly high oil income and widespread electoral support. This eye-opening book illuminates one of the most sweeping and unexpected political transformations in contemporary Latin America. Based on more than fifteen years' experience in researching and writing about Venezuela, Javier Corrales and Michael Penfold have crafted a comprehensive account of how the Chávez regime has revamped the nation, with a particular focus on its political transformation. Throughout, they take issue with conventional explanations. First, they argue persuasively that liberal democracy as an institution was not to blame for the rise of chavismo. Second, they assert that the nation's economic ailments were not caused by neoliberalism. Instead they blame other factors, including a dependence on oil, which caused macroeconomic volatility; political party fragmentation, which triggered infighting; government mismanagement of the banking crisis, which led to more centralization of power; and the Asian crisis of 1997, which devastated Venezuela's economy at the same time that Chávez ran for president. It is perhaps on the role of oil that the authors take greatest issue with prevailing opinion. They do not dispute that dependence on oil can generate political and economic distortions—the "resource curse" or "paradox of plenty" arguments—but they counter that oil alone fails to explain Chávez's rise. Instead they single out a weak framework of checks and balances that allowed the executive branch to extract oil rents and distribute them to the populace. The real culprit behind Chávez's success, they write, was the asymmetry of political power.

Reasonable Rx

Author: Stan Finkelstein
Publisher: FT Press
ISBN: 9780132703994
Size: 52.82 MB
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A Real Plan for Making Drugs Affordable–and Promoting Innovation, Too “This book is a necessity for understanding the pharmaceutical industry. Both the pluses and minuses of the present system are set forth with a judicious combination of historical narrative, economic analysis, and statistical data. The highly original proposals for reform will be a major stimulant to analysis and policy-making.” –Kenneth Arrow, Nobel Laureate in Economics, Professor Emeritus, Stanford University “This is a timely book by authors who know what they are talking about. They tackle a big problem: rising drug prices that are threatening to overwhelm us all–and especially those with limited or absent health care insurance. Will we drive people overseas for healthcare? Will there be social unrest? This book describes the problem and then offers a solution. Worth a careful read by everyone, pharmaceutical manufacturers and government policymakers especially.” –Roger Williams, M.D., Chief Executive Officer of the United States Pharmacopeia and a former senior official of the Food and Drug Administration “This book confounds two sets of skeptics: Those who say there’s no way to resolve the conflict between the need to fund pharmaceutical research and our desire to keep medicine affordable; and those who think that economics never has anything good to say.” –Honorable Barney Frank, Congressman from Massachusetts “This book comes at the right time and could become the starting point of discussions, which will eventually lead us into new era in the healthcare care industry. It will without a doubt become a must for insiders of the pharma- and biotech industries.” –Dr. Jürgen Drews, retired President of Roche Pharmaceutical Group Global Research Acknowledgments viii About the Authors ix Introduction xi Chapter 1: Drugs and Drug Prices 1 Chapter 2: The American Way to Discover Drugs 21 Chapter 3: The Drug Industry Today 39 Chapter 4: Are Drug Companies Risky? 59 Chapter 5: How Not to Lower Drug Prices 77 Chapter 6: Squandering R & D Resources 103 Chapter 7: How to Lower Drug Prices 129 Appendix: Our Solution in Detail 155 Index 177

Marx At The Margins

Author: Kevin B. Anderson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022634570X
Size: 38.40 MB
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In Marx at the Margins, Kevin Anderson uncovers a variety of extensive but neglected texts by Marx that cast what we thought we knew about his work in a startlingly different light. Analyzing a variety of Marx’s writings, including journalistic work written for the New York Tribune, Anderson presents us with a Marx quite at odds with conventional interpretations. Rather than providing us with an account of Marx as an exclusively class-based thinker, Anderson here offers a portrait of Marx for the twenty-first century: a global theorist whose social critique was sensitive to the varieties of human social and historical development, including not just class, but nationalism, race, and ethnicity, as well. Through highly informed readings of work ranging from Marx’s unpublished 1879–82 notebooks to his passionate writings about the antislavery cause in the United States, this volume delivers a groundbreaking and canon-changing vision of Karl Marx that is sure to provoke lively debate in Marxist scholarship and beyond. For this expanded edition, Anderson has written a new preface that discusses the additional 1879–82 notebook material, as well as the influence of the Russian-American philosopher Raya Dunayevskaya on his thinking.

The Revolution Of Everyday Life

Author: Raoul Vaneigem
Publisher: PM Press
ISBN: 1604866780
Size: 10.46 MB
Format: PDF
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Naming and defining the alienating features of everyday life in consumer society, an impassioned critique of modern capitalism argues that the countervailing impulses that exist within deep alienation present an authentic alternative to nihilistic consumerism. Original.

Does Every Woman Have An Eating Disorder

Author: Stacey M. Rosenfeld, PhD
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780989851831
Size: 55.67 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Do You Have an Unhealthy Relationship with Food or Your Body? Does every woman have an eating disorder? It's a bold question but one that must be asked. Why is it that today's women--successful students, career women, wives, and mothers--are struggling more than ever with food and weight? Even those who don't suffer from a clinical eating disorder seem to have some sort of issue around food and weight. We live in a culture of culinary abundance but are taught to do whatever it takes to shrink our flesh. From an early age, women are bombarded with messages regarding what size and shape they should be, a campaign that takes a toll on their relationship with food, their self-esteem, and their health. It's hard to go a day without seeing an advertisement for a new diet product, overhearing a conversation about weight between colleagues or a plan of attack between friends as they brace themselves for dining out, or reading a headline about our nation's obesity crisis. In Does Every Woma

Waste Uncovering The Global Food Scandal

Author: Tristram Stuart
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393077357
Size: 13.28 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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The true cost of what the global food industry throws away. With shortages, volatile prices and nearly one billion people hungry, the world has a food problem—or thinks it does. Farmers, manufacturers, supermarkets and consumers in North America and Europe discard up to half of their food—enough to feed all the world's hungry at least three times over. Forests are destroyed and nearly one tenth of the West's greenhouse gas emissions are released growing food that will never be eaten. While affluent nations throw away food through neglect, in the developing world crops rot because farmers lack the means to process, store and transport them to market. But there could be surprisingly painless remedies for what has become one of the world's most pressing environmental and social problems. Waste traces the problem around the globe from the top to the bottom of the food production chain. Stuart’s journey takes him from the streets of New York to China, Pakistan and Japan and back to his home in England. Introducing us to foraging pigs, potato farmers and food industry CEOs, Stuart encounters grotesque examples of profligacy, but also inspiring innovations and ways of making the most of what we have. The journey is a personal one, as Stuart is a dedicated freegan, who has chosen to live off of discarded or self-produced food in order to highlight the global food waste scandal. Combining front-line investigation with startling new data, Waste shows how the way we live now has created a global food crisis—and what we can do to fix it.