White Coats

Author: Jacqueline Marino
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781606351307
Size: 45.15 MB
Format: PDF
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Originally published in substantially different form in various issues of Cleveland magazine.

Black Man In A White Coat

Author: Damon Tweedy
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250044634
Size: 76.91 MB
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"When Damon Tweedy first enters the halls of Duke University Medical School on a full scholarship, he envisions a bright future where his segregated, working class background will become largely irrelevant. Instead, he finds that he has joined a new world where race is front and center. When one of his first professors mistakes him for a maintenance worker, it is a moment that crystallizes the challenges he will face throughout his early career. Making matters worse, in lecture after lecture the common refrain for numerous diseases resounds: "more common in blacks than whites." [This book] examines the complex ways in which both black doctors and patients must navigate the difficult and often contradictory terrain of race and medicine"--

Voices From The Rust Belt

Author: Anne Trubek
Publisher: Picador USA
ISBN: 1250162971
Size: 57.92 MB
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“Timely . . . [the collection] paints intimate portraits of neglected places that are often used as political talking points. A good companion piece to J. D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy.”—Booklist The essays in Voices from the Rust Belt "address segregated schools, rural childhoods, suburban ennui, lead poisoning, opiate addiction, and job loss. They reflect upon happy childhoods, successful community ventures, warm refuges for outsiders, and hidden oases of natural beauty. But mainly they are stories drawn from uniquely personal experiences: A girl has her bike stolen. A social worker in Pittsburgh makes calls on clients. A journalist from Buffalo moves away, and misses home.... A father gives his daughter a bath in the lead-contaminated water of Flint, Michigan" (from the introduction). Where is America's Rust Belt? It's not quite a geographic region but a linguistic one, first introduced as a concept in 1984 by Walter Mondale. In the modern vernacular, it's closely associated with the "Post-Industrial Midwest," and includes Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, as well as parts of Illinois, Wisconsin, and New York. The region reflects the country's manufacturing center, which, over the past forty years, has been in decline. In the 2016 election, the Rust Belt's economic woes became a political talking point, and helped pave the way for a Donald Trump victory. But the region is neither monolithic nor easily understood. The truth is much more nuanced. Voices from the Rust Belt pulls together a distinct variety of voices from people who call the region home. Voices that emerge from familiar Rust Belt cities—Detroit, Cleveland, Flint, and Buffalo, among other places—and observe, with grace and sensitivity, the changing economic and cultural realities for generations of Americans.

White Coat

Author: Ellen L. Rothman
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0688175899
Size: 79.17 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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White Coat is Dr. Ellen Lerner Rothman's vivid account of her four years at Harvard Medical School. Describing the grueling hours and emotional hurdles she underwent to earn the degree of M.D., Dr. Rothman tells the story of one woman's transformation from a terrified first-year medical studen into a confident, competent doctor. Touching on the most relevant issues in medicine today--such as HMOs, aIDS, and assisted suicide--Dr. Rothman recounts her despair and exhilaration as a medical student, from the stress of exams to th hard-won rewards that came from treating patients. The anecdotes in White Coat are funny, heartbreaking, and at times horrifying. Each chapter taes us deeper into Dr. Rothman's medical school experience, illuminating her struggle to walk the line between too much and not enough intimacy with her patients. For readers of Perri Klass and Richard Selzer, Dr. Rothman looks candidly at medicine and presents an unvarnished perspective on a subject that matters to us all. White Coat opens the infamously closed door between patient and doctor in a book that will change the way we look at our medical establishment. In White Coat, Ellen Rothman offers a vivid account of her four years at one of the best medical schools in the country, and opens the infamously closed door between patient and doctor. Touching on today's most important medical issues -- such as HMOs, AIDS, and assisted suicide -- the author navigates her way through despair, exhilaration, and a lot of exhaustion in Harvard's classrooms and Boston's hospitals to earn the indisputable title to which we entrust our lives. With a thoughtful, candid voice, Rothman writes about a wide range of experiences -- from a dream about holding the hand of a cadaver she had dissected to the acute embarrassment she felt when asking patients about their sexual histories. She shares her horror at treating a patient with a flesh-eating skin infection, the anxiety of being "pimped" by doctors for information (when doctors quiz students on anatomy and medicine), as well as the ultimate reward of making the transformation and of earning a doctor's white coat. For readers of Perri Klass, Richard Selzer, and the millions of fans of ER, White Coat is a fascinating account of one woman's journey through school and into the high-stakes drama of the medical world. In White Coat, Ellen Rothman offers a vivid account of her four years at one of the best medical schools in the country, and opens the infamously closed door between patient and doctor. Touching on today's most important medical issues -- such as HMOs, AIDS, and assisted suicide -- the author navigates her way through despair, exhilaration, and a lot of exhaustion in Harvard's classrooms and Boston's hospitals to earn the indisputable title to which we entrust our lives. With a thoughtful, candid voice, Rothman writes about a wide range of experiences -- from a dream about holding the hand of a cadaver she had dissected to the acute embarrassment she felt when asking patients about their sexual histories. She shares her horror at treating a patient with a flesh-eating skin infection, the anxiety of being "pimped" by doctors for information (when doctors quiz students on anatomy and medicine), as well as the ultimate reward of making the transformation and of earning a doctor's white coat. For readers of Perri Klass, Richard Selzer, and the millions of fans of ER, White Coat is a fascinating account of one woman's journey through school and into the high-stakes drama of the medical world.

A Heart For The Work

Author: Claire L. Wendland
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226893278
Size: 45.22 MB
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Burnout is common among doctors in the West, so one might assume that a medical career in Malawi, one of the poorest countries in the world, would place far greater strain on the idealism that drives many doctors. But, as A Heart for the Work makes clear, Malawian medical students learn to confront poverty creatively, experiencing fatigue and frustration but also joy and commitment on their way to becoming physicians. The first ethnography of medical training in the global South, Claire L. Wendland’s book is a moving and perceptive look at medicine in a world where the transnational movement of people and ideas creates both devastation and possibility. Wendland, a physician anthropologist, conducted extensive interviews and worked in wards, clinics, and operating theaters alongside the student doctors whose stories she relates. From the relative calm of Malawi’s College of Medicine to the turbulence of training at hospitals with gravely ill patients and dramatically inadequate supplies, staff, and technology, Wendland’s work reveals the way these young doctors engage the contradictions of their circumstances, shedding new light on debates about the effects of medical training, the impact of traditional healing, and the purposes of medicine.

Burning The Short White Coat A Story Of Becoming A Woman Doctor

Author: Eve Shvidler M.D.
Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc
ISBN: 1483424634
Size: 35.71 MB
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Elle Gallagher is a an ambitious first-year medical student embarking on her journey to becoming a doctor in the Midwest. Even though she may have made the right career choice, she still has much to learn about finding the perfect man. She is surrounded by Kaity, a bombshell blonde classmate who falls for her geeky Indian lab partner, and Jainey, a sensible and cynical law student who is tragically denying herself love. After a masochistic night of speed-dating, Elle accidentally stumbles into the arms of Missouri’s biggest playboy, an incident that damages her self-esteem and spins her into a roller coaster of self-discovery. Together, Elle and Kaity confront the realities of rigorous medical school training while trying to maintain their need for male companionship. Burning the Short White Coat exposes the personal battles that single women must overcome in balancing a demanding profession and the desire to find a trusting and loving relationship.

White Coat Clenched Fist

Author: Fitzhugh Mullan
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 9780472031979
Size: 80.66 MB
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In the sixties, Fitzhugh Mullan was an activist in the civil rights struggle. While in medical school, Mullan was shocked by gaps in what the students learned, and the lack of humanity in the classroom. Later, Dr. Mullan was outraged at the conditions he discovered when he began to practice. He helped found the Student Health Organization, organized the Controversial Medical Collective at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx, and struggled to offer improved medical care to those who needed it most and could afford it least. This landmark book charts the state of medical school and practices in the 1960s and 70s. This new edition is updated with a preface in which Dr. Mullan reflects on the changes in the medical field over the last thirty-plus years. Fitzhugh Mullan is Murdock Head Professor of Medicine and Health Policy at George Washington University. He worked at the U.S. Public Health Service where he attained the rank of Assistant Surgeon General (1991-1996). Dr. Mullan is the co-founder of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and the author of numerous books, including Plagues and Politics: The Story of the United States Public Health Service, and his most recent book, Narrative Matters: The Power of the Personal Essay in Health Policy.

What I Learned In Medical School

Author: Kevin M. Takakuwa
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520246812
Size: 29.17 MB
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A group of vivid, first-person stories of medical students who don't "fit the mold" and have had challenges completing conventional medical training.

Old And Sick In America

Author: Muriel R. Gillick, M.D.
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469635259
Size: 60.11 MB
Format: PDF
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Since the introduction of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965, the American health care system has steadily grown in size and complexity. Muriel R. Gillick takes readers on a narrative tour of American health care, incorporating the stories of older patients as they travel from the doctor's office to the hospital to the skilled nursing facility, and examining the influence of forces as diverse as pharmaceutical corporations, device manufacturers, and health insurance companies on their experience. A scholar who has practiced medicine for over thirty years, Gillick offers readers an informed and straightforward view of health care from the ground up, revealing that many crucial medical decisions are based not on what is best for the patient but rather on outside forces, sometimes to the detriment of patient health and quality of life. Gillick suggests a broadly imagined patient-centered reform of the health care system with Medicare as the engine of change, a transformation that would be mediated through accountability, cost-effectiveness, and culture change.

White Coat Tales

Author: Robert B. Taylor
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 331929055X
Size: 16.76 MB
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This new edition of White Coat Tales presents intriguing stories that give historical context to what we do in medicine today—the body’s “holy bone” and how it got its name, a surprising reason why gout seemed to be so prevalent several centuries ago, and the therapeutic misadventure that shortened the life of Eleanor Roosevelt. In addition to many new tales, this revised edition contains 128 illustrations, such as images of Baron von Münchhausen aloft with cannonballs and Vincent van Gogh’s portrait of his doctor showing a clue to the painter’s health. Read about legendary medical innovators, diseases that changed history, illnesses of famous persons, and some epic blunders of physicians and scientists. The author is Robert B. Taylor, MD, Emeritus Professor, Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine, and Professor, Eastern Virginia Medical School. Dr. Taylor is the author and editor of more than 33 medical books. To see Dr. Taylor lecture on the history of medicine, go here: https://youtu.be/Zx4yaUyaPRA